Infographic: Positive Windows 8 reaction visualized

By Tom Warren, on 27th Sep 11 10:43 pm with 51 Comments

Microsoft unveiled Windows 8 to the world earlier this month and one company was waiting in the wings to measure people’s reactions.

Social media firm MashWork created an infographic based on what people were saying about Windows 8 after it was revealed earlier this year. Half of all tweets favored Windows 8′s Metro style design compared to Apple’s iOS software and Google’s Android operating system. MashWork collated 65,968 messages shared on Twitter between June 15 and September 22. Around 42% of the messages were collected during Microsoft’s BUILD developers conference earlier this month. MashWork analyzed all the tweets and figured out that Xbox LIVE integration on Windows 8, a Windows App Store and fast boot times in Windows 8 were amongst the most talked about features.

“The most interesting thing I found was that people were so receptive to Windows 8 on a tablet,” said MashWork founder Jared Feldman, in an interview with VentureBeat this week. “A lot of times when you get very well-educated people, who know all the products on the market, they evaluate new things and immediately start hating and ripping it apart.” MashWork found that Windows 8 seems to have appealed to most Twitter fans. “What we found for the most part was that people are genuinely excited about Windows on a tablet — so much so that we actually have developer clients who are using this infographic to drum up excitement for Windows 8 before getting their hands on a developer kit to create apps (for the new platform),” Feldman added.

The visualized excitement over Windows 8 builds on the impressive unveiling of Windows 8. Microsoft managed to keep the majority of Windows 8 features relatively secret. Windows 8 offers a reimagined Windows experience with Microsoft’s Metro style user interface. Microsoft is expected to deliver a beta copy of the operating system at CES 2012.

Windows 8 Infographic

  • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

    I hope microsoft look at this and figure out how to make people believe Windows 8 will work on a desktop… because at the moment even i don’t think it will. 

    • http://twitter.com/adamUCF Adam

      Having use my Samsung slate dev device as a “desktop” with mouse and keyboard to write code, I’ve found that it actually works quite well. I was skeptical but the UI actually makes sense with a mouse/keyboard.

    • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

      without a touchscreen its like playing Angry birds on a PC. 

    • http://twitter.com/adamUCF Adam

      That’s the thing… it’s not. Have you spent some time with Win8 with a mouse and keyboard?

    • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

      Of course.

    • Guest

      A lot of web pages these days are laid out a tiles. I fail to see how what people are doing already in their browser, which is where most people even on PCs spend their time, doesn’t work for the OS.

      Yes, in the DP the transitions are clumsy and the entire UI needs a lot of work. That’s not at all surprising in a DP. If by the time we see an early beta those issues haven’t been removed and the entire UI refined, then yes I’d be worried too. But for now, it’s only a minor concern.

    • Emi Cyberschreiber

      yeah because old start menu was so efficient and keyboard and mouse worked better on it /s

      and since Im using windows 8 as my main OS. i cant use it, i cant play videogames, i cant do anything. oh wait, yeah i can. just like windows 7 but in a different way. and for me cooler since i like metro UI.

    • Guest

      The challenge is that it has to appeal to more than you. Ideally, for MS at least, is needs to strike a chord with a majority of users. Otherwise, they’ll either stay on the version of Windows they’re on, or continuing migrating to OS X or even Chrome OS or Linux.

      I agree that once you get used to the new start menu it’s actually better and more efficient than the old one. But a lot of people like a simple uncluttered desktop, and for them a Screen full of multi-colored blocks is confusing/annoying, at least initially.

    • Stoffel

      uncluttered desktop ???
      I’ve seen so many desktops with 50 or 60 shortcuts on it. How is that any easier

    • Anonymous

      Dude, the days of cluttered desktops with dozens of shortcuts are OVER. Welcome to reality!

  • http://twitter.com/kid_jenius Daniel Paulino

    the desktop interface is awkward at most, but it works. as long as the transition between start menu to desktop is instant and smooth, it works. it’s still awkward though, going from a chromeless experience to the desktop feel.

    • Guest

      Yeah. that’s my concern with Metro. It’s very binary. People either love it or hate it. And unfortunately they’re somewhat evenly split.  If you focus on tablets the “like” numbers go up slightly. But if you focus on the desktop, based on what we’ve seen with the DP, they go down.

      That’s quite different from the original iPhone and its OS. While the table of icons wasn’t any great innovation, adding touch caused a majority of users to say “now that’s an improvement overall”. So there wasn’t a lot of resistance. Unless MS changes the UI pretty dramatically from the DP, I worry that a lot of desktop users are going to say “no thanks”.

  • Anonymous

    Whoever did this infographic needs to be hired by Microsoft to teach all of their product teams how to make a well-designed good-looking infographic using their own design language.

    • Guest

      Like your profile icon!

    • Guest

      I like the gradient effect of his/her tiles. I haven’t used Windows 8 yet, but I don’t think the tiles have that effect. Heck, the entire metro design could probably use that gradient effect.

    • Anonymous

      Gradient for the sake gradient, he’ll no. Gradient to drive a point home, absolutely…

  • Anonymous

    If microsoft simply added a setting in the control panel to turn metro on/off then 90% of people would love it. If you subtract metro then it can only be loved more than 7 on desktop.

    Edit: Not that i dislike metro it’s just that something like that is likely to go down the ribbon/vista route of negative first impressions tainting it if it is forced.

    • Mykel

      I read a post that shows you how you can change the start menu on the Desktop end back to normal instead of the metro look, it’s a very simple tweak to ONE registry key. With that said, I think the normal Start menu will be available and a feature to turn on and off in Windows 8. This is what I’m hoping for.

    • Anonymous

      Yeah I’ve seen that. But really it should have been an accessible option. I think that not including that single toggle switch in control panel has been Microsoft’s biggest mistake with windows 8. Judging by this infographic though it seems they’re still ahead despite that.

    • Guest

      What part of this being a developer preview did you miss?

    • Mykel

      Perhaps in the Beta, I think the DP was more to show off the Metro UI than anything..

    • Emi Cyberschreiber

      first, its a developer preview. that means for developers to develop applications for Windows 8. which mean obviously it will miss some options. i dont understand this “if they added  toggle option to turn it off” i dont understand it, since its not like you have to stare at it 1902830 hours. did you stare at old start menú that much to care about?
      Microsoft wants people to make metro apps, since the old desktop is no more than an App right now.

      so i dont understand this “they would love it” if you understood everything behind Windows 8, you would see how even for changing logon screen you need metro UI. and change what you really want to sync with your live ID.

      if you want Windows 7 as Windows 8… maybe you are the ones who should stay in Windows 8. if you cant see more than a new UI. also… people think its  bad since its green, i changed it and mine looks really gorgeous. so if they didn’t add a way to change the background i don’t think they will let these negative people who cant understand the tech behind windows 8 make them have a toggle to remove the new start menu which does exactly the same the old start menu but more.   

    • Guest

      You can download an app that does it now: BluePoisin.

  • Jimmybanks

    having used windows 8 with a desktop and mouse exclusively, sure it works, but with far more pain and frustration than using windows 7

    • Jimmybanks

      that was supposed to be a reply to “Adam” woops

    • Guest

      Except of course that you can hack it to restore the W8 start bar, in which case it works exactly like W7, only with fast boot, spell check, faster VM mode, etc, etc. etc

    • Guest

      W8>W7 start bar

  • Anonymous

    with google struggling to use the OS dumping tactics that worked on android phones but aren’t working on tablets, windows 8 will prove to be the only credible ipad challenger. google failed to anticipate that the only reason android was successful was because when you dump your OS on something people see as a necessity, you’re bound to get great traction. Things work different on tablets which people don’t see as a necessity. PCs on the other hand are seen as a necessity and if MSFT can convince people to dump the PC for the PC-that-is-a-tablet runing windows 8, then they’ll take off like a rocket.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Olisaebuka-Maduka/1332058518 Olisaebuka Maduka

      Finally! I see someone else who gets it. Great comment my friend, you are definitely seeing the entire forest not just a single tree. 
      Win8 will succeed on tablets not because it’s a luxury/cool device like the ipad but because it’s your PC too. I’ve been saying for a while now that the ipad is a market on its own, which is why google has been losing there (lets face it, anything that is not an ipad in such a market will either come across as fake or poor imitation, afterall why would I want to buy an ipad that is not an ipad), but Microsoft doesn’t want to enter that market, it wants to ‘reimagine’ the tablet concept it created about ten years ago now that the technology has caught up with the idea.
      Another thing most people don’t get is that this is the full realization of BillG’s dream of the tablet becoming mainstream by 2012, it’s the future of personal computing (this means it’s much more bigger than the idea of an ipad). After win 8 launches, laptops and desktops will become niche devices with tablets being the predominantly manufactured form factor by OEMs; all you’ll ever need is a tablet with a desktop docking station (mice, keyboard, speakers, etc) or laptop docking station (keyboard + trackpad) or both (one at the office, the other at home or vice versa), while at most times you’ll be moving around with the tablet, enjoying content (videos, internet, ebooks, newspapers for those early morning bus/train rides) or using it to get work done that does not need the precision of a mouse and keyboard. 
      It’s an exciting future and the ‘metro’ UX is getting us there.

    • http://testlabbet.tumblr.com Fredric Öslöf

      This!

      I cannot agree with you more. Spot on my friend!

    • Seth_p

      Yep, I totally agree. I’m mainly excited at the opportunity it’ll give me as a developer, so yay! :)

    • Anonymous

      I agree with most of this except for 1 minor point, and that is the idea of tablet becoming main stream. It’s not a question of tablet vs desktop vs laptop anymore. In this MSFT is changing the game in my opinion. The tablet is a key component of the new desktop. The PC of the near future is an adaptive computing device that allows form to follow function in the true sense of the word.

      In the past you may have used a laptop for travel a desktop for heavy intensive work and a tablet for light load and browsing. Win 8 is all 3 experiences in 1.

      When you dock a win8 tablet into a lightweight (let’s call it a travel oriented) base you could essentially have your laptop/notebook/netbook. Need more power? You could attach a win8 slate to a more powerful base. Say something for graphic rendering work or running a SQL instance. Need to sit back and enjoy a movie? Just detract it and the experience is in your hands already.

    • Guest

      Not fully with you there. I’d say Android succeeded on phones for several reasons:

      1) MS totally f*cked up with WM and got caught standing still by iPhone
      2) Their inability to respond quickly left a vacuum for all the OEMs who had already committed to not doing an in-house OS
      3) Android popped up at the right time as a credible alternative, thereby allowing the OEMs to at least try and compete (for which they’re still thankful)
      4) The price was attractive (or so it seemed at the time before the lawsuits hit)
      5) OEMs figured that the Google name would generate some decent brand pull (which it did).

      Google faces some big challenges now, particular on the legal side. Although I think their purchase of MMI may be the biggest blunder of all. How any Android-supporting OEM can see that and not at least start hedging their bets is beyond me. But let’s not kid ourselves. Google is still much better positioned in mobile overall than MS and probably will be for some time. And that mobile position may eventually bleed over into more tablet success, even though it hasn’t so far, which is exceedingly lucky for MS since they’re still a year away from having an answer to iPad of more than a year ago.

  • Emi Cyberschreiber

    Windows 8 is amazing. the problema is the design… that Green wasn’t nice for everyone i customized my metro UI. and sure it looks different. since i used a large 1900px across my screen it feels cool to see how the picture follows the metro UI.

    also the keyboard and mouse Works the same. sure… used the same start menú since 95 its not like people will get used fast to instead of waiting for a menu to appear right there… you will have to wait for a full screen metro menu.
    but it doesn’t work any different, also when someone actually shows me how and why the new menu is worse than the old start menu. i will believe all these “its not for keyboard nor mouse” when i perfectly click and and type with my keyboard.
    the old start menu was nice, but some people even complained about the vista/7 one. saying xp one was better bla bla.
    but really… i dont see anything positive in old start menu. you know folders folders and more folders. its the exact same thing now. only with tiles across and using search is obviously easier.

  • Guest

    So 44% don’t think it will work well on a desktop based on seeing just a DP? LOL.

    • Anonymous

      In all fairness the dp is not mouse friendly but does urge you to just use touch and gestures. Made me consider buying a dell duo :)

    • Anonymous

      Just as significant, that means 56% believe it will work well on a desktop. From how people negative about it talk about it, you’d think everyone agreed with them unanimously.

  • Anonymous

    Looks like Metro is a big FAIL on desktop! I guess that means back to the drawing board!

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ricardo-Dawkins/746307628 Ricardo Dawkins

      More sales for Windows 7. happy now?

    • Guest

      Yeah, a product that hasn’t even been released yet is a big fail. Your intellect is right up their with your profile idol.

    • Anonymous

      if w8 is a success on tablets, it won’t matter that it is not a success on desktops. MS will still make money on w7 and make money on w8 on tablets. Eventually people will get used to metro and it will succeed on all platforms. 

    • http://twitter.com/laserfloyd Lewis McCrary

      Except you can use the desktop on your desktop.  I have a non-touch laptop that I run WDP on and  I haven’t gone back to Win7 on that machine yet.  Some better Metro controls from a mouse/keyboard would be nice though.

  • http://testlabbet.tumblr.com Fredric Öslöf

    This thread would
    turn very usefull if everybody would state if their comment about Win8 is based
    on the fact that they are using win8 right now or if they have no first hand
    experience. I have installed the developers preview 32-bit version and this is
    my opinion:

    The Metro UI makes
    greater use of screen estate in its native state than any other OS
    does. But, you should see it as a interface for experiencing and sharing
    content. Think of it as a successor of media center, it is more like a media
    environment with the (aero-likeish) feature that simplifies multitasking.

    This is of course particularly useful when using
    tablets or laptops for casual browsing while consuming and sharing different
    content and media. It hides all menues and panels and sets focus on content
    experience. In one way it is windows reimagined because the old
    “window” experience is gone as they have erased the actuall frame.
    Metro is built with touch in foucus, but it is still very usefull with mouse
    and keyboard. 

     

    However, if you are using windows in a desktop
    environment with one or more external monitors or projectors etc. Then you are
    still able to run Win8 in the desktop experience with the aero commands. There
    are even several enhancements to the desktop experience. Cloud storage shows up
    in explorer, the new taskmanager features more data and controll over startup
    programs, the taskbar stretches across all your monitors and shows on what
    screen the window is active on, pressing one of the keyboard shortcuts give you
    immediate access to all your usual settings and actions as you would have on
    win7. There is a lot more, but in it’s essence: There is literally NO
    compromise between metro and the desptop view. You DON’T have to choose between
    the two interfaces, because THEY BLEND.

    I use win8 on a Dell Studio XPS 13 with a 23″ external widescreen monitor
    and I have settled with the metro UI mainly on the external screen for
    browsing and watching videos. Then I use the laptop screen in the desktop
    environment for “static stuff”, the kind of stuff I occasionally need
    to poke around with, like going through folders looking for documents, playing
    music from spotify, etc. 

    Hope this was helpfull!

    Fredric Öslöf, Malmö

    Twitter@fredricoslof:twitter 

    Tumblr
    http://testlabbet.tumblr.com

    • Anonymous

      The thing is you get more empty space on iOS/Android because they use simple 3-D icons. But what value do you gain from all that empty background? Nothing! Microsoft innovated and used that space for something!

    • http://testlabbet.tumblr.com Fredric Öslöf

      You do know that the apps shown at the build Conference was made by summer interns for the demo to show the real developers what kind of Environment metro is. The apps included in the developer preview will not be included in the release candidate.

    • Guest

      Nice analysis.

  • Anonymous

    Why is everyone so concerned about the desktop. From the demo, you just click on start, wait a second for the tiles to show up and start typing the name of the program you want. A list will populate as you type and you select the program. You don’t do your work on the desktop. You do it in your applications. The main function of the OS is to find the application you need and to let you switch between applications. I don’t care the ui is the traditional w7 one or the metro tile ui. Just make it easy to find my programs, switch fast between programs, and overall good performance for the pc and I’m happy.

    • Garaz

      You’re lucky that you don’t care, but for many individuals the start screen distracts them from the desktop workflow. Start menu was, well, just a menu. An “overlay” if you will. Start screen is, well, a screen. It covers everything that you were doing. It’s counter-productive.

  • Austin

    So, how do we use cd’s and old programs…?

  • http://www.gadgetguide4u.com Vivek Parmar

    Haven’t get hands on Windows 8. Waiting for it is launched publicly..

  • Ruddevil

    There is a specific industry of which Windows 8 would be deemed fit straightaway: academic. I’ve tried the dev preview on a 6 year old Dell Optiplex GX520 running on a floor spec of 1 GB memory connected to a Smartboard and it was amazing. It truly changes the experience of teaching and learning. Anyone fancy a 77 inch touch screen (albeit wall mounted)?