Microsoft details new Windows 8 file copy and move UI [video]

By Tom Warren, on 24th Aug 11 5:32 am with 107 Comments

Microsoft revealed on Tuesday its new copy and paste user interface for Windows 8.

Microsoft’s Windows 8 product manager, Alex Simons, revealed the changes in the fourth instalment of the building Windows 8 blog on Tuesday. Copy, moving, renaming and deleting make up around 50% of total command usage according to Microsoft’s Windows 7 telemetry data. “For Windows 8, we want to make sure that using these core file management commands, which we collectively refer to as “copy jobs,” is a great experience,” said Simons.

“There are some pretty cluttered and confusing parts of the Windows 7 copy experience,” he adds. “We clearly have an opportunity to make some improvements in the experience of high-volume copying, in dealing with file name collisions, and in assuring the successful completion of copy jobs.” Microsoft plans to make the following changes:

  • One place to manage all copy jobs: Create one unified experience for managing and monitoring ongoing copy operations.
  • Clear and concise: Remove distractions and give people the key information they need.
  • User in control: Put people in control of their copy operations.

Microsoft has consolidated the copy user experience. “You can now review and control all the Explorer copy jobs currently executing in one combined UI,” says Simons. Windows 8 will display all copy jobs in a single dialog instead of multiple ones. Microsoft has also added the ability to pause and resume copy jobs and cancel them. The third improvement sees Microosft add a detailed view with a real-time throughout graph. “Now each copy job shows the speed of data transfer, the transfer rate trend, and how much data in left to transfer,” says Simons.

File copy/move user interface in Windows 8

Simons admits that the time for copy jobs has been “the source of some pretty funny jokes over the years” but reveals the company has made efforts to improve the accuracy of the estimated time remaining. “We focused on presenting the information we were confident about in a useful and compelling way. This makes the most reliable information we have available to you so you can make more informed decisions.”

Microsoft’s final set of improvements is in the cleaning up of the experience for resolving file name collisions. “We can admit that the current experience can be rather confusing,” said Simons. “Our new design is much more clear, concise, and efficient, providing a much more visible and actionable approach to conflict resolution,” Microsoft has altered the user interface to show all the source files on the left hand side of the conflict dialog and the target location on the right. “If you need to know even more about the conflicting files, you can hover over the thumbnail image to see the file path or double-click it to open it from here,” reveals Simons.

New file copy/move conflict dialog in Windows 8

Microsoft has also removed a number of confirmation dialogs throughout Windows 8. “We’ve also done a thorough scrub and removed many of the confirmation dialogs that you’ve told us are annoying or feel redundant,” said Simons. Dialogs such as “are you sure you want to move this file to the recycle bin?” have been removed. “All of this adds up to building a significantly improved copy experience, one that is unified, concise, and clear, and which puts you in control of your experience.”

  • http://twitter.com/freak180 Javier Arroyo

    There’s also a new start button in the video

    • Numaan187

      good shout mate

    • http://www.aiowiki.com/wiki/User:Reddo Reddo

      nice catch

  • http://twitter.com/michaelantj Michael James

    Finally a pause on file transfers, their catching up to teracopy, finally :)

    • Jinge

      SuperCopier2 is great for that, don’t know teracopy! how is it?

    • http://twitter.com/michaelantj Michael James

      It’s a more colorful version of teracopy

    • http://twitter.com/michaelantj Michael James

      It’s a more colorful version of teracopy

  • GP007

    Nice, I like the changes, it’s good to keep the same tasks into one single UI instead of spitting out multiple copy/move windows up.

  • MSalwayschasingyesterday

    Take that iPad. Oh wait…nevermind.

    • Aaron

      Are you confused?  What does this have to do with iPad?

    • MSalwayschasingyesterday

      What’s the biggest threat to Window’s continued dominance right now, OS X or iOS? Do you see Apple adding bulk large file transfer tools to iOS? No. Why? Because nobody on a tablet has any use for it. At best you’d stream large files from your PC or Mac. This is symptomatic of the problem inherent in making a one-size fits all OS for PC/tablets.

    • Anonymous

      I see it in the reverse, the problem inherent in using a phone OS for phones and tablets is lack of productivity power.  Why do you think all those articles come out saying that a huge percentage of people buying tablets still don’t replace using their laptops/PCs?  With a solid Win 8 tablet based on a full blown OS, you can get a nice tablet with a touch friendly interface and HTML5 accelerated browsing, app running machine, that can dock on your desk or with a keyboard/mouse and bam, instant PC for full power productivity again with a single device.

    • Anonymous

      Because current tablets are toys. They are nice for browsing the internet and looking at media files. Businesses don’t really want to give Google, MS or Apple their sensative files to host on their servers. They are big targets for hackers. Maybe companies will start hosting files on their own servers for web access. Even if you have your files on the web, there might not be internet access. Some companies don’t use wifi for security reasons and 3g connections cut out inside buildings. Right now having the ability take information with you is important.

    • Anonymous

      If tablets are just toys, then why is there so much business adoption? Delta, Alaska Airlines, British Airways, AA, Lowes, various restaurants, Medtronic, GE, Hyatt Hotels.. The list of major corporations adopting these “toys” seem to be growing.

    • markusdevine

      Three of those were airlines who are using them for in-flight entertainment, AA are using them for on the road to get quick access to the internet without the need of a laptop, various restaurants are adopting them and other tablets to use as menus as they can easily update menus without printing, hotels are using them for the same reason as airlines. These are the reasons these companies are getting them.

      They are not getting them as replacements for PCs/Macs/laptops/bulk storage/server management/confidential information. They are being used as third devices to accompany PCs and Macs.

      I know this because I am Product Designer and we have designed things for these sectors along with spending a lot of money on research into these sectors to see the adoption.

      Tablets (unless they become full featured OS’s) will never replace the Desktop/laptop for corporations and businesses who value their productivity and security.

    • Anonymous

      Please tell all the major airlines that they are using iPads for internet access. They seem to think they are using them to replace flight manuals. You’ll soon correct them.

      How does your experience as a product designer affect the decisions of major corporations you don’t work for? Actually how does it affect anybody’s decisions regarding the implementation of tablet devices?

      It’s funny how tablets with full featured OSes have been on the market for over 15 years, yet they have not replaced corporate PCs. Microsoft is working on their, what, sixth full featured tablet OS. Yet, without the “full featured OS” iPads are being incorporated into businesses today, after only 14 months on the market.

      —-
      We all like to think we know best… but neither your opinion nor mine significantly affects the market. You seem to be ignoring what the market is doing. I’m simply observing what the market is doing.

    • markusdevine

      No, I have actually looked at some of your other comments and you seem to be in the business of trying to get under peoples noses. I speak for myself when I say that but as you said I am just making an observation.

      My experience has shown me that most companies are moving fast to implement tablets as they are seen as forward moving consumer products, I am yet to see a major company that is or is going to replace their entire desktop/laptop range with iPads or any Android tablet for that matter.

    • Anonymous

      Interesting. So, by your definition, making a point and discussing it is simply me being “in the business of trying to get under peoples [sic] noses”. And that’s important to state because it makes your position more correct… right?

      As I said, we all like to think we know best. Your ‘experience’ tells you that most companies see tablets as consumer products. My observation is that major corporations are actively deploying these tablets as business tools.

      The iPad has been on the market for only 14 months. How long did it take for major companies to replace their entire desktop range with laptops, which have been on the market for 20 or so years? I don’t think it’s happened yet. Then again, I don’t remember anyone claiming it would happen. If a 20 year old product hasn’t been able to do so, what makes you think a 14 month old product will?

      When did I claim tablets would completely replace PCs? As far as I recall, through our conversation thread, you offered this point. Tablets will replace PCs for many, maybe even most. But completely? Come off it.

    • markusdevine

      Where did I state that tablets would completely replace PC,s? If you follow the thread I said no such thing, I said they will never replace desktops and laptops. They go hand in hand with them. Interesting note though is that you limit an iPad’s capabilities without having a laptop or desktop to sinc it with.

      In regards to my observation of you, no I don’t think it validates my comments at all, it is as I said, my observation.

    • Anonymous

      You made the point with this statement: “I am yet to see a major company that is or is going to replace their entire desktop/laptop range with iPads or any Android tablet for that matter.” That indicated that you think it’s a topic germane to our discussion.

      The iPad doesn’t have limited functionality without a PC, in the same way a laptop isn’t limited without a desktop. The inability to sync an iPad or backup a laptop is not a lack of function, but a lack of access. The only thing an iPad absolutely needs a PC for is OS updates, but that doesn’t limit its functionality, in the same way a laptop that you can’t be upgraded without an update CD or internet access doesn’t limit the laptop’s functionality.

      Soon iPads will allow over the air updates, with iOS 5. Ironically, you need to use iTunes to update it.

      And in regard to personal observations, if they aren’t germane to the discussion, why include them?

    • markusdevine

      A laptop is a full computer minus the power of a desktop, you can get a 2 terabyte laptop, an iPad needs a laptop/desktop for updating/syncing/mass storage(if no access to internet for use of the cloud). How does that not limit its functionality exactly? 

      Lastly, you just said yourself “Soon iPads will allow over the air updates, with iOS 5. Ironically, you need to use iTunes to update it.” Don’t you need a laptop or desktop to use iTunes?

    • Anonymous

      If you have a laptop with only 100 gigs, is it any less capable than a 500gb one? Storage is less, but how is it actually hindered in functionality?

      Do I need to repeat myself about the iPad/laptop sync/backup similarities?

      And lastly, didn’t I clearly state that the iPad required a PC for OS upgrades? “The only thing an iPad absolutely needs a PC for is OS updates” Hmmm. it seems I did. Why are you repeating it as if I didn’t?

    • markusdevine

      I did not say that a laptop is any less capable or that it loses functionality, it was a point about the lack of storage with the iPad, you can get an external hard drive to increase the storage capacity of a laptop, you cannot with an iPad.

      A desktop also needs internet for upgrades, that is not the point. The point is that if you have to rely on another system to do anything then it lacks the functionality of those systems, ie. iPad.

      I am repeating because it also needs to sync with a desktop or laptop otherwise how do you get all your music/videos/podcasts etc that have been built up without downloading them all again, whether it is wireless or not it still relies on laptop or desktop. What part of that do you not understand?

    • Peter

      Both of you’s are wrong. The follow up to the joo joo will rule all.The grid will rock your world.
      Nothing else is like it. See for yourself. Innovative. Striking. Unique.
      The Grid10 stands alone. A new design. Features and functionality not
      found elsewhere. Powered by the amazing GridOS. You will never think of tablets in the same way again. See for yourself.

      GridOS powers Grid10’s stunning user interface and delivers a groundbreaking, unique experience.

      This is no vanilla UI. It fundamentally changes the way you will
      experience a tablet. Completely gesture-based and button-free, Grid10
      lets you navigate naturally, easily and without restriction. We’ve even
      eliminated the boring slide bar to access Grid10. You sign on –
      literally – with your signature.

      Sounds like we have reinvented the wheel, doesn’t it? Well, we have,
      with our wheel-based interaction. A finger tap brings up the wheel and
      its spokes offer a multitude of functions. Just slide your finger
      around the wheel and choose the desired function.

    • markusdevine

      What?

    • Anonymous

      Wireless drives already exist for the iPad, and more solutions are on the way. So there’s no real limitation there. (see below)

      This upgrade ‘limitation’ that will be gone by year’s end isn’t really worth discussing anymore is it?

      Thank you for being more succinct this time. I understand you clearly now. I don’t want to get into a ‘you said I said’ argument either. We’ve had enough of that already.

      I do have to say that the iTunes transfer requirement is problematic. Getting music/videos/podcasts on the iPad has been inconvenient without a PC, especially for those with large collections. Even with the external drives available for iPad, I’m not sure if it’s any better yet. I haven’t got one to play with yet, nor have I read any reviews.

    • markusdevine

      Your last paragraph, that is what I wanted to get across.

      Anyways, this was fun, I think we nearly took over an entire page with it but that is what it is for.
      I will leave it at that and we might converse again in the future.

      I should probably do some actual work today!

    • Anonymous

      hehehe. Slacker..

      It has been fun. Thanks.

      On the hard drive note, Seagate’s WiFi (GoFlex i think) drive is a solution for 500GB of iPad accessible storage. It’s not as seamless as I’d like, but it’s a first step.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      Sorry I don’t view the fact that you can’t do something as a “feature”…   I know some Apple fans feel that way, but I will NEVER feel that way.   I don’t want to buy a product that I’ll have to “jail break” later into order to get the features I want out of it.

      Bulk copying of files is is something obviously not meant for the tablet interface, it’s meant for the DESKTOP interface.  They’ve already demonstrated how sharing files between apps works through the touch interface,

      The problem is that people focus on a single interface because they have “iPad blinders” on when in fact PC computing is evolving to be much more than that with many different devices (desktops, laptops, walls, tables, tablets, cars, etc)  which require many different interfaces.

    • Anonymous

      Right you are. The problem is never local storage. The need is access to files. If the access is fast and easy, it doesn’t matter if it’s stored on the device.

    • Aaron

      Are you confused?  What does this have to do with iPad?

  • http://twitter.com/Henryed07 Henry Edwards

    Windows Explorer has a new interface, it’s the ribbon effect, plus the extra tools that occur when you select a file like in the office programs

  • PascalBuck

    sorry, but after 15 or so years, it’s still not even close to the Norton Commander file copy. Now THAT’s clean and intuitive :)

    • Anonymous

      Wow. I’m guessing if someone gave you a Lamborghini you would say, “sorry, but after 40 or so years,  this is not even close to a Ferrari…” too. I’m also guessing the third party options will still be in option in W8. I’m really sorry, not everything put on earth meets YOUR expectations.

    • Anonymous

      I always preferred XTree Gold.

  • PascalBuck

    sorry, but after 15 or so years, it’s still not even close to the Norton Commander file copy. Now THAT’s clean and intuitive :)

  • http://timrfox.com Tim Fox

    Notice the different start button!

  • http://timrfox.com Tim Fox

    Notice the different start button!

  • Grannyville7989

    Dislike seeing the Ribbon UI in Explorer.

    • Aaron

      I’m wont try to argue whether the Ribbon or even Metro are the right step forward.  But you have to admit that MS has to implement some kind of changes to the UI.  They cannot just keep the same UI design they have been using since Windows 95 (happy birthday btw!)

    • Aaron

      I’m wont try to argue whether the Ribbon or even Metro are the right step forward.  But you have to admit that MS has to implement some kind of changes to the UI.  They cannot just keep the same UI design they have been using since Windows 95 (happy birthday btw!)

  • Grannyville7989

    Dislike seeing the Ribbon UI in Explorer.

  • Jinge

    Great, they are making some improvements, BUT!! it is still impossible to “enqueue” copies.
    If you copy two big files (or big sets of files) at the same time using slow disks, it would be much better to let the first finish, then start the 2nd one! (it would be faster, and would avoid fragmentation problems!)

    Please MS, it must not be sooo complicated!!!!

    • Aaron

      You are correct but what about scenarios where you have a huge file transfer going on in the background, but in the middle you have a smaller group of files that you wanted to quickly transfer over as well.  Should the user have to wait until the big transfer is finished to have their smaller transfer done?  Should the user have to pause the big transfer first, and then copy over the smaller transfer?  I think this scenario is why it may be better to stick with parallel transfers.

    • http://twitter.com/mventour Matthew Ventour

      perhaps some kind of intelligent scheduling? like maybe if the transfer rate drops below a certain number, it could throttle or re-prioritize the operations.

    • Pinna

      How about a “Force Copy Option” in this case? :)
      @Jinge nice idea

  • Mina

    Norton Commander was good! Remember?

  • philklc

    In the “3 Running Actions” dialog, the three buttons in the title bar has no rounded corners, this might be the new Windows 8 visual style.

  • Anonymous

    Mac has had the multiple copy indicators since OSX 10.0 in 2001. It’s a great feature that I have loved since I got mine in 2006. I wish we had it back with Windows 95.

    In the last 20 years, the lack of pause hasn’t affected me or anyone I know. Nor has viewing the data transfer rate. If it’s going to take too long, we do it another time… Or wait. These ‘features’ are not great steps forward, as they do not solve that problem.

    As for the ‘resolution dialog’. On the Mac, iPhoto and Aperture do this for images. iTunes does this for music and videos. It’s a great feature and about time it was on Windows, but I’m not sure it should be part of the OS. iPhoto and iTunes are media managers, and they are best suited to managing those files. Does this conflict resolver work for, say, MP3, or avi? If it does, it will be a great feature, but if it’s limited to photos….

    • Johnloce

      Troll

    • Anonymous

      why is you here? go back to whatever apple web site you are from! 

    • Anonymous

      I’m here to have discussions on topics relevant to the tech world. But it seems you would rather have bitching sessions. Is that all you’re capable of?

    • Guest

      No. You’re here to kneejerk criticize MS, praise Apple, and hope to incite an argument or two. It’s kinda pathetic.

    • Anonymous

      I criticise Apple too. And Linux. And Android. I also praise them when it’s due. But you’re not really interested in that are you? You just hate when anyone says something bad about the company you like.

    • trashoner

      Yes but if you’re here to have discussions about the tech world make sure to be less biased. You mention a whole lot of crap about iPhoto, Aperture, and other apple stuff. I don’t get what you mean these apps actually compare to the features discussed in this post. I work in a graphic designer studio with a bunch of Macs and I do wish somebody came out with a way to pause a copy transfer. Why because when you’re transferring a pile of files from drive to drive or server to server I’m not just gonna cancel +6 files just so that I can do it later. Time is money and redoing crap like that cost me lots of it. Now just because a feature doesn’t apply to you and your needs doesn’t mean it’s useless and deserves no recognition now does it?

      Also I don’t see how flip 3D is anymore gimmicky than expose anyway. Don’t like to get those windows lost buy the 30″ cinema display. Funny I typed all this crap from my iPad 2, possibly the only device in world that could actually benefit from expose but guess what? It doesn’t have it.

    • Anonymous

      Biased or not, I still believe that the OS should not have that responsibility. Resolving conflicts between different files has been simple. Timestamps and file sizes. The OS should not be expected to be a media manager as well as a file manager.

      With the variety of file types available, this feature cannot be expected to support all of them, and if it doesn’t support every file type, then it’s incomplete.

      Also, if you look at the conflict resolution feature, the layout means more and more mouse clicks and mouse movement than before. The fewer mouse movements, the better. With the current method, one can leave the mouse pointer in a single place and answer all the yes no replacement dialogs with minimal movement. Even better, they can use the keyboard. With this new feature, the movements will be up, down, left, right, and I wonder if the keyboard will be usable.

      Too much mouse movement for the sake of better visuals. It does not improve a user’s productivity. If they had used the current dialog and added the thumbnail to that, it would have retained the level of simplicity.

      Many commenters have convinced me that the pause feature will be useful. It’s a small thing, does not get in the way, and adds new functionality, so it’s fine. I expressed that it’s not necessary as I’ve not had the need for it in 20 years, but many seem to like the idea.


      Flip 3D is a joke. Hate me all you want, but it only works with Aero, which means a powerful graphics card is required to “take advantage” of it, and it does not improve productivity or simplicity boost.

      When pressing Alt-Tab before Flip 3D, you cycled through the windows you had open until the one you wanted came to the front. If you had 15 windows open, it meant you may have to press up to 14 times. With Flip 3D, you get a nice visual, but you still have to press up to 14 times with 15 windows. If you have 100 windows, you still have to press up to 99 times.

      Before Flip 3D with 100 windows open – 99 presses. After Flip 3D – 99 presses.

      And… you can’t click any of the windows in the stack, so even if you can see the window you want, you still have to continue pressing until it’s in the front. No good.

      Expose is completely different. Whether you have 2 windows or 2000, you basically have two actions. Start expose, click the window you want. Since it shows a live image of all the windows open, with no overlapping, you can instantly see which window you want, and can instantly click it.

      With hundreds of windows open, they can be too small to identify, but rarely will you have hundreds of windows open.

      You can also have it show just the windows in the current app. Open Exposé, and use Command Tab to cycle through your apps, then pick the window. A second method with an added simplicity benefit.

      Before Exposé you had to use Command-Tab to switch apps, then Command ` (tick) to switch windows within the app. With 15 windows open, that could mean as many at 14 key presses. With 100 windows, up to 99, just like in Windows.

      Before Exposé with 15 windows – 14 key presses. After Exposé – one key press, one mouse click. With 100 windows – 9 key presses reduced to one plus a mouse click.

      Exposé provides a major boost in ease of use and reduction of time spent performing the task of switching windows. Hardly a gimmick.

      Since Exposé exists, I find it less necessary to use tabs in my browser. With individual windows open, I can pop up Exposé and pick the windows I want directly, instead of clicking a window then a tab. It’s not a big deal, but it makes it that one bit simpler.

      It’s too bad Apple did not have that in iOS. It sucks indeed. I can (and generally do)
      have 100 apps open on my iPhone, and flipping through them all in that one row, four at a time, means 24 swipes to reach the last one if I want to close it.

      It would be nice if instead of the row of icons I have to deal with now, that it showed me a thumbnail of the last state of 9 apps, with the app name, so I could instantly pick the one I want. 9 versus 4 as it means more than twice the apps shown, so fewer swipes. Maybe it could be as many as 25 (30? 36?) on the iPad.

      Fortunately though it really doesn’t affect anything as I don’t have to close them. I have noticed no performance or battery life losses. Plus, if I want to go back to the app, I can just click the icon in the app screens.


      Improved ease of use and added simplicity should be the goal of all computer improvements.

      The pause improves ease of use, so it’s actually good.
      The conflict resolver could have been implemented much better. The current method is much faster. Adding a single thumbnail comparison would have been great, but the three rows make the task harder.
      Flip3D looks great (not really) but does nothing to improve either ease or speed.

    • http://twitter.com/jimmyfal Jimmy Fallon

      “”In the last 20 years, the lack of pause hasn’t affected me or anyone I know. Nor has viewing the data transfer rate. If it’s going to take too long, we do it another time… “”

      Well if Steve didn’t implement it, then why do you want it? There seems to be a little too much of THAT with the Mac guys. I can find a LOT of uses for that over the last 20 years. The constant comparisons make for great banter, but you really can’t compare the much larger job that MS has with the VOLUME of marketshare and VOLUME of users affected by every single change, to the lack of volume of people affected with the MAC and how Steve decides how you should do stuff.I wish I was getting tired of the comparisons, but obviously if I responded to this, I’m not. Love a great battle. I wish they would make a MAC VS PC video game. I never seem to get tired of the banter. So banter on. Gee I can’t wait till we finally catch up to the MAC in marketshare.

    • Anonymous

      What has that got to do with Steve? Does the fact that most users have never had a problem with that make it a great new feature?

      How else do you judge the validity or importance of a feature than comparison? They themselves use comparisons to explain new features, as does every company.

      Do you ever watch Dragon’s Den, or Shark Tank? Yes, the shows are a bit over the edge, for entertainment I guess. But what they show is that everyone thinks they have a great product, but many will not actually affect the market, hence the lack of investment. Yes, the Sharks do make mistakes, but the foundation of the decision not to invest is solid. Making a product just because you can does not mean there’s a market for it. If it’s easy to make yet has not been on the market before, you sometimes have to ask yourself, “why?”

      This is one of those. Pausing a file transfer. In 30 years of computing I’ve never needed it. It would add so little to the experience that it’s completely irrelevant. Like Flip 3D. Cute, but irrelevant.

      If MS is so concerned about it’s great market share, why wouldn’t it focus on getting great features into people’s hands sooner rather than later? It only seems that they are going a bit faster because Apple is now looking like a real threat.

    • Guest

      Dude, it’s one minor feature improvement. Sinofsky even said so at the beginning. Chill. The Fuck. Out.

    • Anonymous

      Good point…

    • Anonymous

      Good point…

    • Anonymous

      I’ve never needed it but there were plenty of time I wanted it. For instance, I have a big file transfer that’s 60% done and 30 minutes to go. If I also want to copy a small file, do I stop the big transfer and restart later? I don’t think so.

    • Anonymous

      Maybe I’m being a bit harsh. After reading yours and other’s comments, it seems like a popular wish. Too bad it took so long, but at least it’s coming.

    • corknut

      I’d think the pause button would be useful if you’re in the middle of transferring a large file or folder and then need to do a smaller transfer. You could pause the larger job so that the smaller one would be faster. I know I’ve wanted to do this on several occasions.

    • Anonymous

      I can see the value there, but in the past I’ve just stopped the transfer and then restarted it later. It’s never been a big deal.

    • Anonymous

      now you don’t have to stop it. Oh wait, you’re that annoying troll. Carry on.

    • Anonymous

      One and the same…

    • Anonymous

      now you don’t have to stop it. Oh wait, you’re that annoying troll. Carry on.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ricardo-Dawkins/746307628 Ricardo Dawkins

      hey fool Windows Explorer manages the file system. Ok. bye.

    • Anonymous

      Carlos Mencia, right?

  • http://startupmeme.com Sardar Mohkim Khan

    Those dreaded checkboxes!  and that’s new one? blurkh!

    • Anonymous

      What’s wrong with check boxes? It’s easy and intuitive. What’s a better solution for selecting items?

    • Anonymous

      What’s wrong with check boxes? It’s easy and intuitive. What’s a better solution for selecting items?

  • Anonymous

    real improvements unlike apple, which all they did with lion was add a grid of icons and call it a day. then charge you 29 bucks for it, or 79 if you want it in usb.

    • Guest

      Mac now is a legacy business for them. They’re focused on the future, which means iOS.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      They need to focus on Mac….  

      The fact that iOS and Max OS are two separate things is a huge problem for Apple.  Why?  because tablets are mostly toys that can easily be replaced.  While if iOS and Mac OS were the same thing then they would actually be penetrating the PC market instead of just the gadget market. 

      The fact of the matter is the PC market still dwarfs the touch tablet market.  iOS has hardly made a dent except in the minds of bloggers.  Once Microsoft comes out with Windows 8, consumers will suddenly have a real choice for their touch computing.  They will have something that can *replace* their laptop not simply another device to browse the web and play angry birds on.

    • Anonymous

      The fact that the PC market still dwarfs the tablet market is no surprise. It’s 30 years old, vs this one that started less than 18 months ago. The fact that the PC market dwarfs tablets means nothing, as all new markets are dwarfed by the incumbents.

      We’ll see if MS make s dent in the tablet market. They haven’t in the last 20 years. Maybe this time they will… ?

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      In that case it’s also unfair to conflate Apples iPad with Micorosft’s Tablet PC.

      They are two different products, targeting two completely different audiences.  The capticitve touch technology used in the iPad didn’t even exist 10 years ago.

    • Anonymous

      So, who did Apple actively target the iPad toward? If I’m not mistaken they just released it without aiming it at any special market segment.

      Capacitive touch technology has been at Microsoft since at least 2001. They demoed it with their Surface technology back then.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      Apple has had pretty much the same focus since day one.  They’ve always been focused on entertainment, simpicity, and  artists/designers.   It doesn’t matter what product they have it usually falls into those catagories.

      Microsoft on the other hand have always been much more favorable for business, education, engineering, medical, etc.

      Entertainment  obviously has a broader appeal to every day consumers than education or business (even engineers listen to music, play games, and browse the web).

      Second capacitive touch on a table is much different than capacitive touch on a phone….  And actually Surface used infrared cameras not capactive touch screens as well as many other multi-touch implementations at the time.

    • Anonymous

      You’re right about the Surface. Ooops. I confused multi-touch with capacitive touch.

      I agree simplicity was the initial focus. I do not agree with the lack of business focus though. In the early years, Apple was relegated to design and layout work because IBM was just too big. IBM PCs were also cheaper, and businesses could not justify the added cost. Apple had to play to their smaller market. They never lost sight of their goal of simplicity though. Macintosh didn’t sell well due to price.

      Microsoft certainly did focus on business at first. That hugs base of IBM computers was a great place for them to start, and Windows was going to take that market since Microsoft had the minds of business with MS-DOS. They then produced WinWord, which was the killer Windows app.

      Microsoft sold corporations the idea of complete integration. This meant migrating everyone to MS servers. NT 3.1, 3.5, then 4. Stability made way for integration. This killed OS/2, Novell Netware, 3Com Lan Manager, LanTastic, Silicon Graphics, and almost got Sun.

      Beyond that, their licensing allowed them to flourish everywhere, except in the home computer market… which meant games. When MS tackled games, they were competing against OpenGL, which was done by Silicon Graphics. MS saw the opportunity to capture the game market as nobody else had the leverage they did. OpenGL vs DirectX. DX easily won with MS’s push.

      So, MS won on two fronts. Windows 95 was at the time the king of business computers and games. Neither Novell, OS/2, Sun, nor Apple could compete at the time. MS focussed on where the money was, and got it. The money in the 90s was in enterprise file servers, business desktops, and home computers where games were king. They had no more competition. They did it right.

      But they lost focus. And Linux came along. And the Internet, and a new server centric market, where they didn’t make a dent. Linux rules there.

      Also, all this time, Jobs was not at Apple. While he was gone, he started NeXT, with the singular focus: Business.

      Things began to change at Apple when Jobs returned. Still catering to design, the move was to capture the entire market. Industrial design became their model for everything. Out with the old, and on to revolutionize Apple.

      And find new markets.

      But to capture the new market, first they needed something to capture people’s minds. The iPod was Apple’s killer product. It helped get the Apple name into everyone’s mind, the way Microsoft did with WinWord (killing WordPerfect) and Windows 95.

      Microsoft ignored Apple as they were focussed on Linux. Then Yahoo. Then Google. They missed the business of the Internet.

      MS now has three core products. Windows Desktop/Server, MS Office, and Xbox. The desktop market is being attacked by Macs, smart phones and tablets, the server by Linux. Xbox by Nintendo, PS3, and somewhat by smart phones and tablets. Xbox will probably win the console match, but it may not matter as gaming moves to more mobile devices. They also shot themselves in the foot a bit with the Xbox. Great gaming console, but it’s canibalized the PCs/Windows gaming market. PlayStation didn’t do that.

      MS Office remains barely touched. I doubt Google Docs will make much of a dent.

      Now, we have another new market that Microsoft is losing in. Smart phones. Apple and Android dominate. And now the tablet market with iPad and other tablets.

      While Apple has a stigma of being focussed on entertainment, it’s not by choice. It was by necessity. They clung to the smaller market share and sharpened their axe with them. Now they have the cash, they are going back to get the rest. Will they succeed? Who knows?

      Microsoft, on the other hand, continues to play the business integration card to an increasingly deaf audience. And young gamers don’t know who they are. Kill MS Office, and Microsoft dies.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      “I need to learn how to be more concise…”

      lol…

    • markusdevine

      And where do Mac’s fit into all this exactly?

    • markusdevine

      And where do Mac’s fit into all this exactly?

    • Anonymous

      You tell me… Are Macs relevant to the discussion?

    • markusdevine

      Yes, if the PC market is decreasing, does the Mac market not also decrease?

    • MSfan

      Even as a MS fanboy I think your wrong.  The development cycle for Mobile is so much faster then PC  having two different OS give speed and flexibility.   MS has been trying for over 10 years to create a unified OS and it is one of the reasons they are behind so far now with tablet and mobile success.  

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      Sorry but Apple created a new market with the iPad, This is in no way a reflection on Microsoft.  It’s a completetle different product & market.  The technology didn’t even exist 10 years ago.

      Microsoft’s domination in the PC space and this has not changed one bit because of the iPad.  This isn’t fanboyism.  It’s just reality.

      The fact that the development cycle for mobile devices is faster is the exact same reason why they can easily be replaced by the newest gadget.   How do you think Android was able to grow so fast in a couple years?

      You can’t say the same thing about the desktop and laptop market.  People aren’t going to change their minds that quickly when it comes to something that a person’s, work, business, school, etc. relies on. At that point your product can’t easily be replaced.. Apple hasn’t reached that point yet with the iPad and they missed an opportunity to do so.

    • http://twitter.com/mventour Matthew Ventour

      there were tablets in the market 10 years ago, just not quite in the form factor we identify them as now. what we didn’t have 10 years ago was an interface specifically tailored for touch input. tablets back then were pretty much the same desktop OS working on a digitized screen.

    • http://twitter.com/mventour Matthew Ventour

      there were tablets in the market 10 years ago, just not quite in the form factor we identify them as now. what we didn’t have 10 years ago was an interface specifically tailored for touch input. tablets back then were pretty much the same desktop OS working on a digitized screen.

    • http://twitter.com/mventour Matthew Ventour

      there were tablets in the market 10 years ago, just not quite in the form factor we identify them as now. what we didn’t have 10 years ago was an interface specifically tailored for touch input. tablets back then were pretty much the same desktop OS working on a digitized screen.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      That’s my point…  The new ”tablet wave” is entirely due to the developments in capcitive multi touch screens.

      Remember the Apple Newton?  Didn’t do so well did it?.  Input makes all the the difference. 

      Which is why Microsoft has invested millions (perhaps billions) in “surface computing” over the past decade.  EVERYONE knows that surface computing is the way of the future.

      However Apple has an advantage because they can come quicker to market with a device faster than pretty much any company out there since they control hardware and software,

      Microsoft on the other hand has to create software to work accross many many many different devices, form factors and scenarios..  They are completely reliant on hardware partners to get out anything into the hands of consumers.  Which means there is a lot more complexity involved.   However In the end this model eventually will win  working with many different vendors creates a lot of variety and options for businesses and consumers.

      Same thing happened with Android.  Android isn’t necessarily “better” than iOS it’s simply offers more options in the market.

    • http://twitter.com/mventour Matthew Ventour

      there were tablets in the market 10 years ago, just not quite in the form factor we identify them as now. what we didn’t have 10 years ago was an interface specifically tailored for touch input. tablets back then were pretty much the same desktop OS working on a digitized screen.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      They need to focus on Mac….  

      The fact that iOS and Max OS are two separate things is a huge problem for Apple.  Why?  because tablets are mostly toys that can easily be replaced.  While if iOS and Mac OS were the same thing then they would actually be penetrating the PC market instead of just the gadget market. 

      The fact of the matter is the PC market still dwarfs the touch tablet market.  iOS has hardly made a dent except in the minds of bloggers.  Once Microsoft comes out with Windows 8, consumers will suddenly have a real choice for their touch computing.  They will have something that can *replace* their laptop not simply another device to browse the web and play angry birds on.

    • Anonymous

      It goes a bit beyond that. The grid of icons also allows novices to quickly arrange and delete programs using iPhone style operations. True, it was possible before, and easy for techies, but the instruction list is longer and more confusing for novices. It’s easy to do on the iPhone, which is in many cases their first Apple computer, so why not add that simple, familiar metaphor to the computer too?

      I think Windows 8 follows WP7 in the same way.

    • Anonymous

      It goes a bit beyond that. The grid of icons also allows novices to quickly arrange and delete programs using iPhone style operations. True, it was possible before, and easy for techies, but the instruction list is longer and more confusing for novices. It’s easy to do on the iPhone, which is in many cases their first Apple computer, so why not add that simple, familiar metaphor to the computer too?

      I think Windows 8 follows WP7 in the same way.

    • Anonymous

      It goes a bit beyond that. The grid of icons also allows novices to quickly arrange and delete programs using iPhone style operations. True, it was possible before, and easy for techies, but the instruction list is longer and more confusing for novices. It’s easy to do on the iPhone, which is in many cases their first Apple computer, so why not add that simple, familiar metaphor to the computer too?

      I think Windows 8 follows WP7 in the same way.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_62XF635MXDYDLOFFX6TCQ6EF6A Aaron Dingus

    What’s interesting is that all this is in in the legacy UI… what does a copy look like in the supposedly main Metro UI?

  • Panda X

    Why is the logo on the front page that of Windows Azure?

  • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

    The real problem is what happens when your copy FAILS…..  The problem that people have is copying a large number of items and something happens right in the middle (ran out of space, read/write error, etc).

    It would be nce if windows kept track of what you’re copying and gave you a way to recover from this instead of leaving you with a partial copy in one area while at the same time making you start the copy over from scratch….

  • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

    The real problem is what happens when your copy FAILS…..  The problem that people have is copying a large number of items and something happens right in the middle (ran out of space, read/write error, etc).

    It would be nce if windows kept track of what you’re copying and gave you a way to recover from this instead of leaving you with a partial copy in one area while at the same time making you start the copy over from scratch….

  • Jussjuss

    Don’t forget to include a Shutdown after copy finished option..ala..Teracopy.

  • http://overhackit.com jamman

    M$ needs to come up with something original, this is just like Mac OS X’s consolidated copy window.

  • Bizobravo

    Um, is it only me or is it just the fact that Linux has been having this “unified copy/paste UI”?!!! Just have a look at Ubuntu, for example!! Looking forward to what they have in store for us next!!

  • Bizobravo

    Um, is it only me or is it just the fact that Linux has been having this “unified copy/paste UI”?!!! Just have a look at Ubuntu, for example!! Looking forward to what they have in store for us next!!

  • Bizobravo

    Um, is it only me or is it just the fact that Linux has been having this “unified copy/paste UI”?!!! Just have a look at Ubuntu, for example!! Looking forward to what they have in store for us next!!

  • http://twitter.com/micahlahren Micah

    Wow GDal, chill.  So, a job list, kind of like the job lists in certain linux operating systems, eh?  Copy much?