Nokia and Microsoft stock jumps as Google’s Motorola deal hints at Windows Phone gain

By Tom Warren, on 15th Aug 11 3:29 pm with 102 Comments

Nokia and Microsoft stock both jumped in early morning trading on Monday.

The increases followed a game changing Google announcement after the company revealed it will purchase Motorola Mobility. The deal, worth $12.5 billion, will see Google “supercharge” Android software on future Motorola handsets and protect fellow Android partners against patent disputes. The news has created a mixed reaction across the blogosphere, with some questioning whether Google’s deal is simply for patents or to control the end-to-end experience of consumers. A number of Android partners, who were briefed about the deal beforehand, voiced their support for Google’s acquisition on Monday. HTC, Samsung, Sony Ericsson and LG all welcomed the news that Google is committed to defending Android and its partners.

Investors and some analysts believe that Google’s announcement could shift some Android manufacturers over to Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform. Microsoft’s stock rose by 1% in early morning trading, whilst Nokia’s rose by 11% – reflecting stock market opinion. Lee Simpson, an analyst at Jefferies International, spoke to Bloomberg on Monday. “It might start to put Microsoft into focus as an alternative platform now, which could indirectly benefit Nokia,” said Simpson. Simpson’s opinion was mirrored by Nokia who issued the following statement:

“This further reinforces our belief that opportunities for the growth of Nokia’s smartphone business will be greatest with Windows Phone. This could prove to be a massive catalyst for the Windows Phone ecosystem. Additionally, with our respective intellectual property portfolios, Nokia and Microsoft are working together to build and nurture an innovative ecosystem that benefits consumers, operators, developers and other device manufacturers.”

Nokia spokesperson, James Etheridge, also called the deal a “massive catalyst” for the Windows Phone ecosystem in an email to Bloomberg News on Monday. “The main player who can buy Nokia is Microsoft and they practically already own them,” Simpson said. “They practically took out Nokia’s smartphone strategy for nothing at the start of the year and no one else would be allowed to buy them underneath Microsoft’s nose.” Mike Walkley, an analyst for Canaccord Genuity, feels that Microsoft and Nokia are the big initial winners from the Google deal. “Windows Mobile seems more relevant than it did last night, and it seems now to have a better chance of becoming a third ecosystem,” said Walkley to Tech Trader Daily. “Microsoft and Nokia seem the big initial winners from this transaction, given that this creates a better chance for more players to support the Windows ecosystem,” Walkley added.

Monday’s announcement is backed by Android manufacturers at the outset mainly because of Google’s promise of patent protection for its operating system. However, in the long term it could see the likes of HTC and Samsung move closer to Microsoft if they question Google’s close relationship to Motorola Mobility. Google’s choice of being a licensor and a licensee will make other licensees uncomfortable in a market that appears to be Microsoft vs Apple and Google. Asymco points out the perils of licensing to your competitors, focusing on Nokia’s Symbian woes. Microsoft must be rubbing their hands together in anticipation.

  • http://twitter.com/Koki_v3 Koki_v3

    I like how some “experts” and “analysts” still refer to Windows Phone as Windows Mobile. “Analyst” my ass, he knows nothing about the platform.

    • http://www.winrumors.com Tom W

      Always makes me cringe when I read Windows Mobile when they mean Windows Phone.

    • Jhonny López

      That’s because we are fundamentalists!

    • http://www.winrumors.com Tom W

      Always makes me cringe when I read Windows Mobile when they mean Windows Phone.

    • Anonymous

      Oh God… I actually thought this ‘expert’ was making a semi-joke when he said EVEN windows mobile (not referring to wp7) would have a chance because of acquisition…..

      Stupid ‘experts’

    • Anonymous

      Oh God… I actually thought this ‘expert’ was making a semi-joke when he said EVEN windows mobile (not referring to wp7) would have a chance because of acquisition…..

      Stupid ‘experts’

    • Naser

      He mean by Windows Mobile is the mobility sector at Microsoft while WP is a part of this sector against Motorola mobility !! he knows exactly what he is talking about it. :)

    • http://twitter.com/Koki_v3 Koki_v3

      you’re wrong.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jesse-Garcia/100000361221634 Jesse Garcia

      Ha! i love blatant statements :) ^^^

    • Neeb

      yea especially when those blatant statements are equally incorrect.  im sure koki here knows it all…

    • http://twitter.com/Koki_v3 Koki_v3

      Well, I do know that Windows Phone is NOT a part of some “mobility sector” called Windows Mobile.

    • Anonymous

      I believe that it the crux of the problem. Say what you will but if the analyst can’t get the WinPhone vs WinMobile straight, imagine what the average consumer thinks about Windows Phone. As good as WP7 phone is (I have a Samsung Focus), Microsoft has done a terrible job of branding their phone OS. I just wish they would just drop the “Windows” branding altogether for the phones. Average people still see Windows brand as a computer and not a mobile device. Perhaps with Windows 8 that imagine will change but I fear that MS will royally screw up the branding/messaging again.

      If MS wants to succeed in the phone space, they need a different message. Just my opinion of course.

    • Tom

      I’ve been saying that since Windows CE.  You can’t leverage one brand into another market.

      There was also that Windows Vista fiasco.  People keep calling it “Microsoft Vista.”  Somehow it didn’t happen nearly as much for “Microsoft XP.”

  • http://twitter.com/mcakins McAkins Online

    Good move! God have mercy on all platforms competing with Windows Phone once users get to know the platform. The platform has the most satisfactory index of users, and once again like the XBox story, Microsoft could be making a killing in the very near future imho.

    • http://www.gadgeterija.net Denis Jelec

      This buildup that Google is doing kinda makes me afraid. Don’t know why exactly, but it still does.

    • Tom

      No, not dominant.  The prediction from IDC, etc. is that WIndows Phone will be number 2 in 2015.  I think that’s about right.

  • Anonymous

    Even without this Googorola business, Windows Phone is in for the long haul, and going to be a success.  Just going to take some time.  :::taps fingers on desk:::

    • Tom

      Looks like Gartner and IDC were right after all, but completely by accident.

      I still think Windows Phone is going to be number 2.  It’s going to be *very* hard getting to number 1.

  • http://www.rwalrond.com RWalrond

    I’m very curious if/can google keep and use the Motorola name? If not, will they rename the company to “Google Mobile”? Won’t a handset that has Google’s name on it automatically carry more weight than say a HTC handset or Samsung handset? I don’t see anyone asking this question yet.

    • Anonymous

      “Google claims it will run Motorola Mobility as a separate business”

      From http://www.winrumors.com/motorola-windows-phones-in-doubt-following-google-acquisition/

    • http://www.rwalrond.com RWalrond

      But Motorola as a company will still be around an owned by Motorola. So Google will keep the name “Motorola Mobility”? Couldn’t that be a bit confusing? Anyhow I guess we all have to wait and see, but unless Google just bought the company for the patents and has alternate plans to just kill it off, it would seem to me that they have to rename it.

    • Guest

      $12.5B would be a lot of money just to get the patents and kill it off. Google might be telling HTC and others that’s the case right now, mostly because they still need them on board. But that’s not the likely long term plan. In fact, there’s been talk for some time that Google was putting together its own telecommunications network. I wouldn’t be surprised if now that Android is well seeded amongst consumers, Google doesn’t lean more and more towards a direct model (i.e. compete against HTC, etc.). And if carriers eventually push back, Google could bypass them with a complete offering (OS, phone, communication plan, etc).  

    • Guest

      $12.5B would be a lot of money just to get the patents and kill it off. Google might be telling HTC and others that’s the case right now, mostly because they still need them on board. But that’s not the likely long term plan. In fact, there’s been talk for some time that Google was putting together its own telecommunications network. I wouldn’t be surprised if now that Android is well seeded amongst consumers, Google doesn’t lean more and more towards a direct model (i.e. compete against HTC, etc.). And if carriers eventually push back, Google could bypass them with a complete offering (OS, phone, communication plan, etc).  

    • NativeFloridian

      I bet they simply keep the “Droid” name moving forward

    • NativeFloridian

      I bet they simply keep the “Droid” name moving forward

    • http://twitter.com/Adiliyo Adil

      Droid is licenced by verizon not motorola.

    • http://twitter.com/Adiliyo Adil

      Droid is licenced by verizon not motorola.

    • Guest

      I imagine that was part of the deal. Motorola has a lot of brand awareness and if Google wasn’t able to use it the value would have been lowered. Google will probably phase the name out over time. And yes, the concern for HTC and others has to be that an *Android* phone from Google direct could eventually carry more weight that one from them. Carriers may also be concerned about Google’s growing power. They’re already not happy about what they see as Google getting a mostly free ride off their pipes. If they decide this effectively creates two mobile monsters with power (they’re already not super happy about Apple but put up with it because of the popularity of iPhone), then they might takes some actions to help others. From their perspective, they don’t want phone OEMs holding all the power.

    • Guest

      I imagine that was part of the deal. Motorola has a lot of brand awareness and if Google wasn’t able to use it the value would have been lowered. Google will probably phase the name out over time. And yes, the concern for HTC and others has to be that an *Android* phone from Google direct could eventually carry more weight that one from them. Carriers may also be concerned about Google’s growing power. They’re already not happy about what they see as Google getting a mostly free ride off their pipes. If they decide this effectively creates two mobile monsters with power (they’re already not super happy about Apple but put up with it because of the popularity of iPhone), then they might takes some actions to help others. From their perspective, they don’t want phone OEMs holding all the power.

  • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

    Exactly…  I’m not sure how this deal benefits Google at all other than for patents.

    Microsoft became dominant because they learned how to PARTNER with hardware manufacturers not become one.

    Now that Google is a handset/tablet maker they are in direct competition with their own partners.  How stupid is that?

    I bet WP7 is starting to look at lot better to Samsung, LG, HTC, Sony, etc…

    • Test1ngi23
    • Anonymous

      “Monday’s announcement is backed by Android manufacturers at the outset
      mainly because of Google’s promise of patent protection for its
      operating system. However, in the long term it could see the likes of
      HTC and Samsung move closer to Microsoft if they question Google’s close
      relationship to Motorola Mobility”

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      Notice how all the responses use the same terms and phrasing?

      It’s obvious  they were told  what to say.  

      There’s a difference between your “official response” to make Google happy and your real reaction.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      Notice how all the responses use the same terms and phrasing?

      It’s obvious  they were told  what to say.  

      There’s a difference between your “official response” to make Google happy and your real reaction.

    • Anonymous

      What did you expect them to say? The we are pissed and we are going to dump them. THey still have a lot invested in Android. However, now they will seriously need to consider diversifying so not all their income is tied to Android and to only other place to go is WP7.

    • Guest

      You’re asking a moron what he thinks? Seriously?

    • Guest

      You’re asking a moron what he thinks? Seriously?

    • Test1ngi23
    • Test1ngi23
  • Anonymous

    MSFT Is about to takeover, cant wait!!!

  • Anonymous

    MSFT Is about to takeover, cant wait!!!

  • Anonymous

    MSFT Is about to takeover, cant wait!!!

  • Test1ngi23

    So now Google has a preferred Android OEM? For all of those who are saying that Samsung, LG, HTC, etc will move stronger to WP7, how is this any different than Nokia being MS’s preferred OEM? In fact Android OEMs still have a lot more freedom for customizations than WP7 OEMs.

    • http://www.gadgeterija.net Denis Jelec

      Customization =/= good thing. One word there: Motoblur.

    • Test1ngi23

      We’re talking about OEMs here. Whether is it good for the consumer is one thing but OEMs love it. They sure are taking advantage of it with Android.

    • Anonymous

      Fandroids r so scared of MSNOKIA  .Thats why u(fandroid) r trolling on winrumor.

    • Anonymous

      Fandroids r so scared of MSNOKIA  .Thats why u(fandroid) r trolling on winrumor.

    • Test1ngi23

      With your previous comment of “Android is doomed”, I think you’re trolling reality.

    • Anonymous

      Dont cry . Get a life ;)

    • Test1ngi23

      Maybe just a few tears of joy after seeing this articles like this http://www.winrumors.com/microsofts-worldwide-smartphone-market-share-drops-below-2/

    • Guest

      MS and Nokia is not going to be anything special… Even if Nokia can pull its way out of this death spiral their are in, they are going to be just another hardware MFG like HTC, Huawei, ZTE, Lava, G7… In fact they may suffer even worst with their higher cost structure.  

    • Guest

      If you don’t Don’t respond to asshat, she’ll eventually go away. Just like she has on other sites.

    • http://www.gadgeterija.net Denis Jelec

      OEM’s “love” it? Yep, that explains IDENTICAL responses “we welcome this…”. Not like they have a choice atm. ;)

    • http://twitter.com/RobertCFP Robert Wade

      Customization being a good thing is quite relative.  Since I work in the Lean/Six Sigma realm, a keynote of the philosophy is that variation is typically wasteful.  Currently, the high degree of variation in Android devices has created a hardware AND software house of cards that, in my opinion, will reach a point of collapse.  This move to buy Motorola may be Google’s attempt to stabilize the house before that happens.  In which case, the very thing that attracted people in droves to Android may be significantly impacted.  They may stabilize the house, but I suspect the platform will be less attractive,thus creating more parity amongst iOS, Android and WP7.

    • http://www.gadgeterija.net Denis Jelec

      Well said.

    • Guest

      “variation is typically wasteful”  and I would agree from a pure engineering environment.  But for marketing, product positioning, brand differentiation, price management variation is far from it.  In fact it  can make the difference between a good product and a world class product.  

    • Guest

      “variation is typically wasteful”  and I would agree from a pure engineering environment.  But for marketing, product positioning, brand differentiation, price management variation is far from it.  In fact it  can make the difference between a good product and a world class product.  

    • http://twitter.com/RobertCFP Robert Wade

      Customization being a good thing is quite relative.  Since I work in the Lean/Six Sigma realm, a keynote of the philosophy is that variation is typically wasteful.  Currently, the high degree of variation in Android devices has created a hardware AND software house of cards that, in my opinion, will reach a point of collapse.  This move to buy Motorola may be Google’s attempt to stabilize the house before that happens.  In which case, the very thing that attracted people in droves to Android may be significantly impacted.  They may stabilize the house, but I suspect the platform will be less attractive,thus creating more parity amongst iOS, Android and WP7.

    • Guest

      Don’t feed the troll.

    • http://www.gadgeterija.net Denis Jelec

      I beg your pardon?

    • http://www.gadgeterija.net Denis Jelec

      Customization =/= good thing. One word there: Motoblur.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      Because it’s not just a “preferred OEM” it’s Google.    It’s an obvious distinction.

      Android started out as been free and open, but I think Steve Balmer was right when he said it’s not as free as people think it is.  As OSes and software become more sophisticated and patents become impossible to overcome more manufacturers will turn towards turnkey solutions rather than investing a lot of energy in customization.

      Even if it’s just perception, Android just became weaker with this deal…

    • Test1ngi23

      “As OSes and software become more sophisticated and patents become impossible to overcome more manufacturers will turn towards turnkey solutions rather than investing a lot of energy in customization.”

      That could still hold true. But I think it’s still to early to tell right now. In a year or 2 we’ll know.

    • UpTownDC

      Agree!!! Motorola was being sued by Microsoft and Apple patents….now since Google purchased Motorola Mobility, that patent suit leads directly to Google now!!! Google are the makers of Android, in the past they “gave” it away for free….now since they will own a hardware company….they own it!! Bad business decision on Google’s part!! They will never settle with Apple or Microsoft. This will play out in the courts!!

    • MSfan

      Except your statement is purely false in the face of what Samsung is doing with their successful Bada OS and  HTC and Huawei is suggesting they may too create their own.  

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      You think samsung devices running Bada OS are anywhere near as successful as Samsung devices running Android?

      Bada is more of a feature phone platform anyway.  Handset makers don’t have any other option for feature phones until MS releases “Tango”

    • Anonymous

      Android is doomed.

    • Test1ngi23

      LOL. ok

    • Anonymous

      You are loling, but you don’t know why. Android doomed is not because of this event, it is because of a lot of other things. I think android fans has three more month to feel proud. Appriate the good times, because when its gone, it’s gone.

    • http://twitter.com/RobertCFP Robert Wade

      Well, wait a sec.  It depends on what Google drives Motorola to DO.  Motorola could play in this two ways. A) Be the preferred/required chip.  B) Be the in-house device.  That last popular device Motorola had was, I believe, the Razor.  If option A is the plan, then OEMs may be headed down the same path they are with Microsoft—minimum specs which, in Google’s case, may be devices based on Motorola tech.  If option B is the plan, then the concerns expressed in the article are valid–that other OEMs will be competing against the in-house device.  To be fair, I’m surprised they other OEMs haven’t already expressed a similar concern regarding Nokia & Microsoft.  Perhaps the whole patent & licensing thing is much more attractive and lucrative in WP7 than they expect it to be with Android.  It remains to be seen.

    • Guest

      Other OEMs haven’t complained about Nokia/MS very much because they were all doing the majority of their business on Android. So it really didn’t matter.  But now that Google has muddied the water, I’m sure they’re going to be asking questions. The advantage MS has is decades of being a level playing field provider. Google didn’t last two years. And some of those OEMs are going to understand that MS only granted a lot of concessions to Nokia because they couldn’t depend on real support from other OEMs. The weeks ahead should be interesting. Especially if we get confirmation that Motorola was just about to sign a patent deal with MS.

    • http://twitter.com/RobertCFP Robert Wade

      Well, wait a sec.  It depends on what Google drives Motorola to DO.  Motorola could play in this two ways. A) Be the preferred/required chip.  B) Be the in-house device.  That last popular device Motorola had was, I believe, the Razor.  If option A is the plan, then OEMs may be headed down the same path they are with Microsoft—minimum specs which, in Google’s case, may be devices based on Motorola tech.  If option B is the plan, then the concerns expressed in the article are valid–that other OEMs will be competing against the in-house device.  To be fair, I’m surprised they other OEMs haven’t already expressed a similar concern regarding Nokia & Microsoft.  Perhaps the whole patent & licensing thing is much more attractive and lucrative in WP7 than they expect it to be with Android.  It remains to be seen.

    • Anonymous

      There is a big difference between having a preferred relationship and actually owning a company. To justify paying $12 billion, Google will have to make sure that Motorola is profitable (they lost $500 million in the last quarter). If Motorola all of a sudden starts making handset that operate better than the other oem’s, then you can bet they will start looking at either WP7 or developing their own os.

  • Test1ngi23

    So now Google has a preferred Android OEM? For all of those who are saying that Samsung, LG, HTC, etc will move stronger to WP7, how is this any different than Nokia being MS’s preferred OEM? In fact Android OEMs still have a lot more freedom for customizations than WP7 OEMs.

  • Test1ngi23

    So now Google has a preferred Android OEM? For all of those who are saying that Samsung, LG, HTC, etc will move stronger to WP7, how is this any different than Nokia being MS’s preferred OEM? In fact Android OEMs still have a lot more freedom for customizations than WP7 OEMs.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Pedro-Roque/100000194503830 Pedro Roque

    This could
    be a major turning point in the mobile world. If MS play their carts correctly,
    they have everything to gain from this Google / Motorola deal.

    Despite the
    fact that Android is “free”, most OEMs have to pay fees to Microsoft, and they
    have to customize the uses experience, and that can’t be cheap.

    Now, MS
    must step up their game, and bring a lot of services currently only available
    in the US a another few markets to everyone. It makes no sense that I can’t get
    Zune Pass in Portugal, while my neighbors in Spain can!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Pedro-Roque/100000194503830 Pedro Roque

    This could
    be a major turning point in the mobile world. If MS play their carts correctly,
    they have everything to gain from this Google / Motorola deal.

    Despite the
    fact that Android is “free”, most OEMs have to pay fees to Microsoft, and they
    have to customize the uses experience, and that can’t be cheap.

    Now, MS
    must step up their game, and bring a lot of services currently only available
    in the US a another few markets to everyone. It makes no sense that I can’t get
    Zune Pass in Portugal, while my neighbors in Spain can!

    • Jinge

      Totally agree on the last point. That is their main weak point: Google has a global strategy for all their services, MS is localized in terms of functionalities, that’s the main reason Bing is not successful in Europe. Nokia will probably help them on the maps functionalities, but they have to keep working on globalization for every successful service if they don’t want consumers not to bee disappointed when they discover they have less services than other countries.
      Google street view is available on many places, streetside mainly US, even they planned to do it in Europe, they have to do it faster…

    • J A

      “Despite the fact that Android is “free”, most OEMs have to pay fees to Microsoft, and they have to customize the uses experience, and that can’t be cheap.”

      This cannot be more false than anything. Android OEMs have to spend lots of resources customizing it for their hardware and also spend on legal suits and on anything they need to do with Android. On the other hand, with Windows Phone, they do not have to spend other than the licensing fee and they get the tools to flash it onto their hardware without having to do anything else. Just like installing XP or Windows 7 onto hardware does not cost anything else other than the hardware and the OS license, the only difference is that the WP OS license is about $15 per device, last I heard of it, while it costs much more for each OEM to actually customise any Android release for their use.

  • Frylockns86

    So, I have to ask: I’m surprised to see this. Was it known that Google was planning to buy them? 

  • NativeFloridian

    I’m curious what is the reasoning for Nokia’s dramatic increase in stock price?  It can’t be soley because they think WP7 will now have more competitors.  It must be the ’rising tide raises all boats’ theory… that more WP7 users will increase demand for Nokia phones, the flagship phone.  Or, is it the thought that Microsoft will counter by purchasing Nokia.

    Personally, seems like there is little incentive for MS to purchase Nokia unless they begin to truly fail.  MS essentially accomplished what Google just did without laying down the cash.

    • Guest

      I suspect the rise is based on expectation that Nokia will be in play for purchase.  Some are thinking, likely wrongly. that the Google decision was to create control of the user experience from OS to hardware, like successful Apple strategy, and would require MS to have to do the same thing.   

  • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

    Microsoft should just go ahead and make WP7 so awesome it doesnt matter how many acquisitions google makes, OEM’s and consumers will be rushing to it!

    • Test1ngi23

      I thought they already did that.

    • Test1ngi23

      I thought they already did that.

    • Joe05

      Yes they should be sadly they seem to struggle with awesome, they seem to prefer good enough and will fix it latter with the next update.  8-(

  • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

    Microsoft should just go ahead and make WP7 so awesome it doesnt matter how many acquisitions google makes, OEM’s and consumers will be rushing to it!

  • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

    Microsoft should just go ahead and make WP7 so awesome it doesnt matter how many acquisitions google makes, OEM’s and consumers will be rushing to it!

  • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

    Microsoft should just go ahead and make WP7 so awesome it doesnt matter how many acquisitions google makes, OEM’s and consumers will be rushing to it!

  • http://twitter.com/efjay01 Ef Jay

    Microsoft should just go ahead and make WP7 so awesome it doesnt matter how many acquisitions google makes, OEM’s and consumers will be rushing to it!

  • GP007

    I don’t think anyones said this yet but just a few days ago you had the Motorola boss say they’re open to using WP7 if they get a Nokia type deal and then today Google buys them?  Can you say coincidence?  I somehow don’t think so. 

    Motorola was going down, losing share and getting suied left and right, this doesn’t change anything.  Google buying them is a patent move, it’s not really going to help Motorola sales IMO, those are dead outside the US and only going to keep dropping in the US as I see it.   Don’t be surprised if in 2-3 years Google puts the death nail in “motorola mobility” and it’ll be a footnote in mobile history like Palm was and like RIM could be as well if their new BBOS7 devices don’t get going, which I doubt they will also.  

    • MSfan

      GP007 your right and I suspect Google will sell off everything but the patents to another company.  

    • J A

      This is very right. Even Motorola’s patents are not lifesavers in anyway as MS, Apple and others are still in legal battles with them over patent royalties they need to pay for. Even though patents may be what Google is buying Motorola for, in light of Motorola’s patent suits situation, I don’t see how it helps Google at all.

    • J A

      This is very right. Even Motorola’s patents are not lifesavers in anyway as MS, Apple and others are still in legal battles with them over patent royalties they need to pay for. Even though patents may be what Google is buying Motorola for, in light of Motorola’s patent suits situation, I don’t see how it helps Google at all.

    • GP007

      Reading some other posts about this it seems that MS and Motorola were close (if this is true) to signing a big cross-licensing IP deal like what MS has with HTC for example.  This would’ve been big and another major blow to android and Googles interests as a whole.

      Also because Motorola was losing money and in deep IP problems of their own there is info that Motorola in turn was going to sue OTHER Android OEMs with it’s own patents which Google just grabbed, which is probably true and also why HTC, LG and Samsung like this Google deal, it saved them from being sued by Motorola.  

      In the end I think Google just blew $12billion away on nothing.

  • Anonymous

    Faster is the keyword for wp7. It seems however they’re only half able to implement it

  • Anonymous

    I must say it’s really fun to see all the people who went berserk over Nokias decision to join Microsoft earlier this year and claimed that this was terrible for all the other OEMs now praise Google for buying Motorola, claiming it’s amazing for the other OEMs.

    Nokia has so much more to offer WP then Motorola has to offer Android.

  • Hmmm

    Will be interesting to see how/if this changes the game from the DOJ and EU perspective. There was already talk that maybe Google shouldn’t be allowed to dump Android on the market for free in an obvious attempt to defend/expand their search dominance. others argued that since it was free, there was no harm. But now that they’re actually in the mobile business on a for profit basis, will the DOJ or EU limit their ability to freely leverage mobile via search?

  • Anonymous

    I think Windows Phone 7 is getting ready to Explode into the market at the expense of Android and RIM. Right now Apple is hovering at About 30 % Android is at 50% and rim is at 20. I think WP7 is about to take over RIM’s Market share and 10~15% of Google’s. Here’s why.

    1) no matter what these OEM’s say Motorola will always get special treatment, meaning other OEM’s will put more money into WP7 devices.

    2)Nokia has a massive fan base that will buy their phones just because of the brand.

    3)If you remember Android was just a speck for about a year. Then the Droid 1 happened. it made people recognize the Droid brand and created a Fan base for other Android phones to leech off of. I think Nokia could be the next “Droid 1″

    4) Windows 8. When people see WP7 for the first time it is rather shocking. Unfortunately ”shocking” doesn’t sell two year contracts. Once people have seen this UI and use it in their everyday lives getting a phone just like it would only make sense.

  • Anonymous

    I think Windows Phone 7 is getting ready to Explode into the market at the expense of Android and RIM. Right now Apple is hovering at About 30 % Android is at 50% and rim is at 20. I think WP7 is about to take over RIM’s Market share and 10~15% of Google’s. Here’s why.

    1) no matter what these OEM’s say Motorola will always get special treatment, meaning other OEM’s will put more money into WP7 devices.

    2)Nokia has a massive fan base that will buy their phones just because of the brand.

    3)If you remember Android was just a speck for about a year. Then the Droid 1 happened. it made people recognize the Droid brand and created a Fan base for other Android phones to leech off of. I think Nokia could be the next “Droid 1″

    4) Windows 8. When people see WP7 for the first time it is rather shocking. Unfortunately ”shocking” doesn’t sell two year contracts. Once people have seen this UI and use it in their everyday lives getting a phone just like it would only make sense.