Silverlight isn’t dead, it’s the heart of Windows Phone, Windows 8 and Xbox

By Tom Warren, on 9th Jun 11 12:22 pm with 122 Comments

Microsoft's Metro design language in action

Microsoft’s three screens and a cloud dream is finally coming true.

Like a fairy tale, Microsoft’s Metro and Silverlight story could result in a very happy ending for the company and its close partners. Microsoft’s tile based user interface will now feature on the company’s software that powers phones, PCs, tablets and TVs. Microsoft revealed its Windows 8 Start Screen user interface earlier this month. and less than a week later filled in the missing piece of the puzzle, Xbox. The unification of the Windows Phone, Windows 8 and Xbox user interface is an incredibly important one for Microsoft as a company and its strong user base. Microsoft is hoping its Metro magic will enchant users worldwide into sticking with Windows over Chrome OS/Android, OS X/ iOS and others. Backed with its strong SkyDrive and Windows Azure cloud offerings, Windows 8 and Windows Phone could please businesses and consumers alike.

Microsoft’s bold unification of user interfaces is just the start of a multi device convergence that the company has been touting for years. “Three screens and a cloud” was Ray Ozzie’s promise, Microsoft’s former Chief Software Architect. Ozzie started to use the phrase in early 2009 but the company struggled over the course of 2009 and 2010 to make good of its promise. Facing increased competition from Apple and Google, Microsoft announced Windows Phone 7 in February, 2010, just weeks after Apple boss Steve Jobs introduced the world to the iPad. Microsoft struggled to provide a decent answer to the iPad throughout 2010 but struck back earlier this month. Windows 8′s new Start Screen interface and integration will run across the desktop, laptops and tablets. Despite Microsoft’s struggles over the past few years, every cloud has a silver lining. Microsoft’s saviour will come in the unlikely form of Silverlight.

Silverlight is the application development platform for Windows Phone 7. Developers use it to access the hardware aspects of Windows Phone devices and native phone functionality. Silverlight can also use the XNA framework and access Xbox LIVE. Microsoft’s E3 announcements appeared lacking on the face of it, but lurking in the background the company just revealed a key element of its three screens strategy. The new Xbox dashboard uses Microsoft’s tile user interface and the company deliberately revealed a new “apps” section of Xbox LIVE. The apps section contains existing Xbox applications like Netflix, Facebook, Hulu and Zune but also hints at a future of new applications with a Marketplace mention. Microsoft has been working hard with content partners to ensure its new live TV service goes off with a bang when it launches later this year but it has also been secretly integrating Silverlight support into Xbox. Microsoft previously revealed in November that it was planning to bring Silverlight to the Xbox as part of the next wave. The company has been suspiciously quiet about its Silverlight Xbox plans ever since. WinRumors has spoken to several company insiders who have confirmed that Microsoft is forking code from the Windows Phone 7 Silverlight stack directly into the Xbox dashboard.

Silverlight apps for Xbox will likely be made available later this year alongside the new dashboard. The support would allow Windows Phone developers to port across their applications with little effort required. There’s even talk of Kinect support to allow Xbox and Windows Phone applications to be controlled in a similar way to a multitouch screen. Whatever Microsoft has planned, Silverlight is at the heart of the Xbox applications Marketplace. Windows 8 also follows a similar path. Microsoft threw its weight behind HTML5 in Windows 8 by revealing that its new Start Screen will be powered by HTML5 and JavaScript based web apps. Microsoft failed to mention Silverlight but this is an important part of the Windows 8 Start Screen. The software giant is readying a new application model codenamed “Jupiter” that will allow developers to create Silverlight based applications, deployed as AppX packages (.appx). The packages will be part of a new Windows application store, pre-installed with Windows 8. Windows Phone 7 applications will port across to AppX with little effort from developers. Microsoft’s BUILD conference in September will be the launch pad for Microsoft’s true three screens and a cloud strategy. Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO, previously described the next-generation Windows as risky. Next-generation Xbox and Windows Phone is equally risky, it’s lock users into apps across devices or lose out to competitive solutions from Apple and Google. Will Microsoft hit back against stiff competition or risk all for nothing? September will tell.

Metro across Windows 8, Windows Phone and Xbox

  • http://twitter.com/jimmyfal Jimmy Fallon

    Yeah, looks good a YEAR from now, jeesus, talk about pushing your luck…

    • GP007

      Why a year?  Unless all you’re looking at is Windows 8.  WP7 + Mango is coming this year, the new Xbox dashboard and it’s apps/marketplace is coming this year.   Those two things for developers are huge.  If the tools are there and I expect they will be, then with little tweaking MS just made every Xbox dev a WP dev and every WP dev a Xbox dev overnight.     Also if they know that their apps will also work on Win8 once it RTMs then it’s worth the wait and they can start on porting and even building new ones.   You need to give devs enough time as well, so this is good for them to.

  • Anonymous

    In this “war of ecosystems” microsoft seems to have a fighting chance with silverlight. Uisng it as the basis for the app model which see developers being able to target xbox, windows phone and windows 8 with minimal code changes if any at all. Personally very interested to see where it’s headed. Really with they could communicate this stuff better though, a lot of silverlight developers were spooked with the “HTML5 as basic for apps” in windows 8. They did the same thing at mix2010 when they didn’t announce anything about silverlight and people stgarted speculating that it was dead. Of course it’s not dead, but microsoft really could do a better job of reasuring developers that this platform has a solid future in microsoft products.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001039271971 Martyn Metalous

    This developers says “YES!!!!”, nice one MS

  • dEuZ

    This is an awesome piece of news for developers!

  • dEuZ

    This is an awesome piece of news for developers!

  • http://www.rwalrond.com RWalrond

    I can’t wait for BUILD! Already registered!

    Sometimes it’s good to be late, Microsoft seems to be readying a more integrated platform across these devices compared to Apple and google. Wonder if we’ll see the kinect camera built into a tablet? I think for sure we will see a W8 magic trackpad with edge detection to replace your mouse on the desktop.

    • http://www.twitter.com/wixostrix WixosTrix

      I totally agree.  The public just sees what Microsoft is offering on the front-end but have no idea about what’s happening on the back-end and how much more powerful it will be than the competitions.  Zune is seen as a failure, but those devices could have just been a way to just say to distributors, “Hey we have a user base so give us better deals.”  The Zune Marketplace has over 11 million DRM-free high-quality (up to 320 kbps) MP3 tracks as well as an extensive video collection. It’s only second to iTunes but the only digital distributor that is capable of complete head-to-head competition.  They’re working close with developers, OEMs, and mobile operators across the board.  They’re tying all their software and services together, even others: In Mango you can MMS a picture from Facebook without even downloading it to your phone, that’s brilliant and it’s because of the foundation they are building.  Apple showed off that huge amazing datacenter, and what do the consumers get.  No streaming and 30-day expiration on picture that are automatically uploaded from camera rolls. It’s pathetic, but classic Apple. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Simon-Paul/12449401 Simon Paul

      I totally agree. Everyone has been saying that Microsoft is “late” to the game, when in all reality they are working hardcore on an underlying foundation across all their platforms that once released will create the most fluidly integrated eco-system to exist. Their competitors such as Apple, Google, Sony (Play Station), are going to crying to their mothers when MS comes full force with its fully integrated eco-system.

      For the past 10 years I’ve been so disappointed in Microsoft from a consumers point of view, but with the release of Zune, and then WP7, I knew they had something up their sleeve. And now with Windows 8 and Xbox too, get ready for it!

      The developers need to stop freaking out, in a year, they are going to be GOLDEN with a huge array of devices they can sell their apps to.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Simon-Paul/12449401 Simon Paul

      I totally agree. Everyone has been saying that Microsoft is “late” to the game, when in all reality they are working hardcore on an underlying foundation across all their platforms that once released will create the most fluidly integrated eco-system to exist. Their competitors such as Apple, Google, Sony (Play Station), are going to crying to their mothers when MS comes full force with its fully integrated eco-system.

      For the past 10 years I’ve been so disappointed in Microsoft from a consumers point of view, but with the release of Zune, and then WP7, I knew they had something up their sleeve. And now with Windows 8 and Xbox too, get ready for it!

      The developers need to stop freaking out, in a year, they are going to be GOLDEN with a huge array of devices they can sell their apps to.

  • http://twitter.com/cameron_mck sca2pula

    Awesome news! I’m not personally a developer but it’s very obvious why this is a huge boon for a developer. 

    Also, I’d just like to say that this was an excellent article and I can see you’ve already taken in advice from the feedback users have submitted.

    • http://twitter.com/AsTh11 Alessandro Grua

      I  totally agree with you, it was a very good article. Loads of information explained well for non-devs like me!

      BTW, I can’t wait for this coming true! Next year I will have to buy a new Xbox, a Windows 8 tablet and a Windows Phone 8! :D

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Simon-Paul/12449401 Simon Paul

      Will be doing the same, its going to be AWESOME.

    • Anonymous

      I was beginning to get worry here since MS appeared to slap their Developers in the face with the claim of HTML5 and JavaScript as the foundation of the Apps. I am a C# Programmer and I don’t want to go the HTML route. Silverlight is awesome and needs to evolve to be better and be in everything MS.

    • Therealjomon

      Amen!

    • Guest

      Was worried for a moment too, but I guess they can’t get away with just providing HTML5 + Javascript and not any “real” programming language. HTML5 + Javascript is great and everything, but you just can’t do the same things you can with something like .NET: I mean, 3D games in HTML5 anyone?
      Silverlight is what they should be supporting here (as they are). Whilst I personally haven’t used Silverlight, I have done some work in WPF (uses XAML) and Windows Forms in C#, and I believe it is pretty much the same – and I believe it is a great platform.

    • Anonymous

      Envision a world where C#.SL.NET.HTML5&JS come together under VS. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Simon-Paul/12449401 Simon Paul

      ohhhh yes…..

  • Scott

    I hate when people say that a framework is dead only based on the fact that it wasn’t mentioned in a keynote. Microsoft revealed that Windows 8 will come with a new application development platform, based on HTML5. But, AFAIK, they never said it will be the only one.

    Great post, Tom. :)

    • Tom

      That is true.

      However, it surely was not a good idea for Sinofsky to answer a *direct* question about Silverlight after the demo by mumbling through the back-compat story (in-browser, on the desktop) without even mentioning tile.  And for Microsoft PR to batten down the hatches and go into “run silent run deep” mode after the absolute *furore* coming from developers.

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      In-browser and on desktop is crap. We want the ability to run SL/WPF as immersive apps. And running SL in the immersive browser is a silly crutch.

  • GP007

    @tom  Nice job on that picture above that uses the same Win8 start screen background color.  When you put it all side by side like that with the same BG then it really does show how they’re all the same in the end, size being the difference and some other minor things.  

    • http://www.andrew-stockdale.co.uk Andrew Stockdale

      Agreed. They’re all pretty consistent when you think about it, but that picture is extremely visual in just how similar they really all are. The Metro Tile interface really is the new face of Microsoft. And it’s a damn good looking one!

    • Kives343

      I am not going to lie I didn’t notice they were different until after the article.

    • Kives343

      I am not going to lie I didn’t notice they were different until after the article.

  • Anonymous

    If Metro is the beauty, and Silverlight is the heart, surely Kinect (at least for Win8 and Xbox) is the brains. I strongly suspect that Microsoft is going to begin licensing out the Kinect tech to computer manufacturers so they can integrate Kinect into laptops and such, instead of generic webcams. The Win8 interface is SCREAMING for Kinect-style gesture navigation

    • BucksterMcgee

      I’d say Kinect is more the Eyes and Ears, while the united platform is the brains.

      Going are the ways of the separate devices, each limited in what they can do. The Apple cult chants about the post pc era (don’t believe me, go watch WWDC video and listen to the crowd), while praising devices that are more and more limited. With Windows 8, Windows Phone, and Xbox (and more as we’ll see), we are moving away from the limited and instead moving to the infinite, while keeping it beautiful, simple, yet powerful.

      Apple is moving backwards trying harder and harder to wall off its garden, as to not let anyone out.
      Microsoft is moving forward, opening all devices from handhelds to screens big enough for a wall, in every form factor imaginable, and even ones that haven’t even been created yet to a unified and eloquent experience that works in all imaginable forms, from keyboard and mouse, to voice and touch, whether you use a remote or a controller, or even a gesture in the air it works just as you would expect it to. And it’s all thanks to Metro.

      Why does Metro work so well? Why is it so universal that it works in all forms and feels so natural to ask why haven’t I been doing it this way always? Its because we have been. We’ve been using it every day of our lives, across every reach of the world, but don’t even realize it. Metro IS that most common denominator in the world. It is the way that throughout our history and even in our most modern world which we can communicate universally, simply, and accurately. It strips down all the unnecessary and gets to the core content of whatever it is you are trying to do. In all of our existence on this planet we have never found a more eloquent, accurate, and simple way to communicate universally then what Metro is based off of.

      That’s why it works. That’s why it’s so universal. That’s why it just feels right.

    • NativeFloridian

      Wow!  I had no idea the new interface was such a profound creation.  Perhaps the Metro UI instruction manual can be canonized as the newest book in the Bible.

    • BucksterMcgee

      Nah not a profound creation, just something that really works well because it’s based off on something that’s worked really well in the rest of the world. No need to be an ass. Oh and the Metro UI doesn’t need a instruction manual, it just works.

    • NativeFloridian

      Not trying to be an ass… I too am very excited about the new UI.  I just chuckled when I read that “Metro IS the most common denominator in the world”.  I was just trying to point out the hyperbole in your intial post and hope that it brings others the same little laugh today.

      BTW, I agree that the new UI will not need a manual… that is perhaps its greatest selling point!

    • BucksterMcgee

      Not sure what’s funny about that, the concepts which Metro is based on are the most common denominator. Everything you see in internation airports, big city public transportation, even something as simple as the little people used to represent Men and Women for bathrooms are all part of that. It doesn’t matter what language you speak it all means the same thing, simply and accurately. Symbols, like arrows, simple colors, and typography are all apart of that as well. You don’t have to have a cluttered sign that’s designed to look like a road to best convey direction, the metro style is a much more efficient way to do that. If you ever ask for directions, what’s the fastest, simplistist way it can be described… with a simple point of an arm, hand, or finger; Directions are broken down from everything unnecessary, down to a single direct point. These are the fundalmental elements, the most common denominator, that exist in the world. There’s a reason why they work. That’s the point I was trying to get across, but I guess i’m glad you laughed at it, eh sort of.

    • Anonymous

      You’re taking it too seriously.  We love the new UI in Win8 and you do have a point with your post.  It’s just that some of us haven’t heard some of those phrases since the last time we went to church.

    • BucksterMcgee

      All I can say is, don’t mistake passion for religion.

    • Anonymous

      While passion is a word rooted in Latin, it only survived because of its reference to the suffering of Jesus.  It’s easy to mistake passion for religion.

    • BucksterMcgee

      Not sure what’s funny about that, the concepts which Metro is based on are the most common denominator. Everything you see in internation airports, big city public transportation, even something as simple as the little people used to represent Men and Women for bathrooms are all part of that. It doesn’t matter what language you speak it all means the same thing, simply and accurately. Symbols, like arrows, simple colors, and typography are all apart of that as well. You don’t have to have a cluttered sign that’s designed to look like a road to best convey direction, the metro style is a much more efficient way to do that. If you ever ask for directions, what’s the fastest, simplistist way it can be described… with a simple point of an arm, hand, or finger; Directions are broken down from everything unnecessary, down to a single direct point. These are the fundalmental elements, the most common denominator, that exist in the world. There’s a reason why they work. That’s the point I was trying to get across, but I guess i’m glad you laughed at it, eh sort of.

    • BucksterMcgee

      Not sure what’s funny about that, the concepts which Metro is based on are the most common denominator. Everything you see in internation airports, big city public transportation, even something as simple as the little people used to represent Men and Women for bathrooms are all part of that. It doesn’t matter what language you speak it all means the same thing, simply and accurately. Symbols, like arrows, simple colors, and typography are all apart of that as well. You don’t have to have a cluttered sign that’s designed to look like a road to best convey direction, the metro style is a much more efficient way to do that. If you ever ask for directions, what’s the fastest, simplistist way it can be described… with a simple point of an arm, hand, or finger; Directions are broken down from everything unnecessary, down to a single direct point. These are the fundalmental elements, the most common denominator, that exist in the world. There’s a reason why they work. That’s the point I was trying to get across, but I guess i’m glad you laughed at it, eh sort of.

    • NativeFloridian

      Not trying to be an ass… I too am very excited about the new UI.  I just chuckled when I read that “Metro IS the most common denominator in the world”.  I was just trying to point out the hyperbole in your intial post and hope that it brings others the same little laugh today.

      BTW, I agree that the new UI will not need a manual… that is perhaps its greatest selling point!

    • http://twitter.com/starksimon Stark

      This is THE best explanation of Metro UI/UX I’ve ever read. Thumbs up.

    • http://www.winrumors.com Tom W

      Great comment, thanks for taking the time to share your insight :)

    • Xmissile

      I haven’t heard of an evangelist as passionate as you since David Koresh.

  • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

    This is just a speculative editorial on outdated information. Who knows how Jupiter has been mangled up until today.

    • http://twitter.com/mikehole mikehole

      Have to agree but still have my fingers crossed!!!

    • phil jay

      How do you mean that? Jupiter seems to fit perfectly what has been going on with ms lately, following channel9 and stuff. a ui model for native and managed code as well as silverlight. Everyone gets the cake, and it’s the cornerstone for win8 UI development(also internally) I’d say.

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      I’m basing this on the D9 presentation, where the top Windows development dog went out of their way saying that anything else than HTML5 lands on the old desktop.

      And someone creating immersive windows in an alpha build with reverse engineered APIs means nothing. For all intents and purposes, these APIs could be unsupported and for internal development only. Just like on WP7, where the phone apps use a fancy fast managed UI framework, whereas third party apps have to dick around with Silverlight.

    • Tom

      You mean an *unmanaged* framework on Windows Phone for internal and OEM applications.  They certainly didn’t rewrite IE in C#.

      I don’t think they’ll go HTML + JS only.  However, after all the stuff Microsoft has done recently, I no longer discount any rumors about Microsoft, however ridiculous and illogical.

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      UIX on the phone , which is used for system UI, is managed code. IE on the phone is just some COM object (i.e. the renderer) with a managed UI wrapped around it.

  • http://unhub.com/eingoluq Eingoluq

    The biggest Killer to me is that touch enabled apps ported from Windows phone to Xbox will get Kinect voice and gesture functionality. When Windows 8 comes along, provided Kinect is available as well in some way, Those ported apps will work on Windows 8 Automatically.

    Imagine commanding your PC, “Computer…Videos…Charlie Sheen…WINNING!”

    • GP007

      What MS should aim for is a deal to integrate a future version of kinect tech (smaller etc) directly into monitors for laptops and tablets and even desktops.  

    • Mosquito

      maybe even in phones ;-), that would be really awesome

    • Mosquito

      maybe even in phones ;-), that would be really awesome

    • Dhaoracle

      Why should they have it integrated when you they could just create smaller more powerful kinects that can be places on your desktop or on top of your screen?? That way all of the money still goes to them. That way they can give people the option to use it across all screen without alienating others like tv.

      It would be nice to see them use it in the new Windows 8 tablets that way a person could connect the the tablet to a tv/other PC with the interface being emulated on the screen. Then it could be used as a remote/larger keyboard with options. I think the same could be implemented into the Windows Phone 8 also.  

  • http://twitter.com/mdtauk martin anderson

    I will feel better about the Silverlight/XNA situation when Microsoft makes an official statement on where it stands with Xbox and Windows 8.  Guess they will keep shtum until /Build in september

  • Renzo

    You know, I sorta assumed the Windows 8 support would be there but are they also telling me that my XAML skills will also now allow me to develop APPS for Xbox as well!? Like Netflix..!?

    The kids are gonna love this.

  • Anonymous

    I still think HTML5/JS is the way to go for the future. Silverlight is great for MS eco system but I don’t see Apple ever allowing it on Ipad or Iphone. I definitely prefer C# over JS and XAML over HTML5 but I can’t see making an app targetting specific users when I can use another framework to target them all. Hopefully Build will announce some great tools for HTML5/JS or announce SIlverlight coming to IOS and Android!

    • Anonymous

      well, I think it depends on the kind of app. For most consumer smartphone apps, user experience is king. Having a native feeling experience is essential. Having an app that looks the same that targets iOS, wp7 and android might not always be a great idea. Furthermore, I would expect for the forseeable future it’s going to be easier to make apps for platforms in their native launguage, c#, objective c and java than it would be to write them in html, try to get them to the same funtiuonality that you would have more easily been acheived using the native programming platform on each platform and then have to debug it so it works right in all browsers.

      html5 and javascript is great and all, but it’s going to be much harder to create large and scalable apps in it than in more conventional programming launguages like c# and java for quite awhile. Even google write most of their stuff in java first and have it compiled into javascript.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with you to an extent but Javascript has gotten a lot more powerful now that we have HTML5 and Web Services, not to mention all the frameworks out there like jquery etc. Granted it still is a lot harder to deal with compared to managed code but the reach it has for customers just makes that hardship seem like a no brainer.

      As for performance, I definitely agree! But I feel it is very safe to assume that all platforms are going to go out of their way to have amazing html5/js performance because their survival will depend on it. And you will definitely still have to have some platform specific code for UX but it will not be a complete rewrite.

      In my perferct world Silverlight would be on every platform, but I don’t see that happening and feel the next best thing is HTML5/JS.

    • Renzo

      The way I see it is: the more the better.

      I’m a web developer at heart so I’ve championed HTML and JavaScript since the 90s (not too happy about CSS lately though) but during the day I work on the Microsoft stack and I prefer to use Silverlight instead when available.

      Keywords there are “when available”. It comes down to that fundamental rule of development: Always use the right tool for the job.

      Within the Microsoft ecosystem it turns out, Silverlight is like having Thor’s hammer, and I will use it over the web standards if possible (although Win8′s first-class support of HTML5 is really interesting, we’ll have to wait and see).

    • Anonymous

      The “When Available” is the biggest reason for HTML5 for sure. It used to be with enterprise apps I would always use Silverlight because I knew what the users would have but now so many have Ipads I find myself reverting to HTML5 and JS. Like I said, it makes me sad because I agree with you about Silverlight being an amazing tool, just hard to find a place where it is appropriate for all my users these days

    • Renzo

      One of the wisest sayings passed on to me by the great coders of yore was that there is no such thing as a “do-it-all” tool, never has been and never will be. Once I understood that it put my worries at ease.

      Learn HTML5 and learn Silverlight, no big deal. Senior management might not understand why you need two projects… so just blame Microsoft or W3C or whoever… and just have fun playing with your toys ;-)

    • Anonymous

      I agree, but if I have to make an HTML5 version anyhow doesn’t make much sense to make a Silverlight one too : )

    • Renzo

      In your situation if I wanted best of all worlds I  would put most of my business logic inside a web service and then just code two UIs to consume the data: one in HTML5 and one in Silverlight.

      Separation of concerns my friend, in this case you’ll just have to keep separate code bases for the presentation but not the backend.

    • Anonymous

      I am just saying I don’t see why I would make a Silverlight version when I have to make an HTML5 version. Right now I am doing exactly what you say but not by choice, only because the Ipad doesn’t run silverlight. But the HTML5 version works on all of my clients! I don’t want two seperate UI’s. I just want to write it once and maintain it that way.

    • Guest

      But why would Microsoft want to get Silverlight on Andriod and iPad?
      They would want all their apps running on their platform only (so that you have to buy a Windows computer to run them). I think they want to leverage the vast amount of Windows developers and use them to build/for their own app store.

    • Anonymous

      Microsoft wants a part of every developerment story on all popular platforms. You have to look at the big picture that has Azure, Visual Studio, IIS, Windows Servers, Sharepoint, SQL, etc.

  • http://twitter.com/RobertCandelori Robert Candelori

    Tom Servo may well be right, but thing we have to consider is that I find it difficult to believe that Microsoft is going to discard all of its hard work in developing the best development tools in the business, the most advanced languages in the business, in favour of plain old HTML5 and Javascript. Yeah, those languages are more accessible, but they are nowhere near as powerful or efficient. To that extent, I think Silverlight will play a role in Windows 8. Anything else would be bizarre, out of character and extremely risky – alienating developers is not a good idea.

    • Anonymous

      Completely agree. I just wish they communicated this more instead of assuming it’s obvious. It is kinda obvious when you think about it, but considering the amount of people who’s businesses/careers depend on silverlight/.net having a strong future in widnows 8 they could be doing better.

    • Anonymous

      That’s kinda what Tom is saying. HTML/JS will definitely be supported in W8, but SL is here to stay. It’s the glue that keeps the 3 screens and the cloud together.

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      They’re not going to drop “backwards compatibility” (I feel dirty to call it like that). Regular Win32 and .NET applications, that includes WPF and Silverlight, will continue to work. Their wording during D9 however made it pretty clear that time that they’re going to run on the regular desktop only and not as immersive apps. And Microsoft isn’t exactly making any strides to dissuade that notion, if there’s any need to backpedal, say as in the case of Silverlight/WPF being supported for immersive apps after all.

      That’s why all these Silverlight and .NET developers are ranting at.

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      They’re not going to drop “backwards compatibility” (I feel dirty to call it like that). Regular Win32 and .NET applications, that includes WPF and Silverlight, will continue to work. Their wording during D9 however made it pretty clear that time that they’re going to run on the regular desktop only and not as immersive apps. And Microsoft isn’t exactly making any strides to dissuade that notion, if there’s any need to backpedal, say as in the case of Silverlight/WPF being supported for immersive apps after all.

      That’s why all these Silverlight and .NET developers are ranting at.

    • Anonymous

      It sounds absolutely bonkers to treat the most popular Windows development framework (and consequently the million+ developers that use it for a living) as a second-class citizen. 

      I’d say that HTML5/JS will be the premier way to develop “immersive” live tile apps for the Windows 8 start screen, but there’s no way you wouldn’t be able to do the same in the more traditional frameworks.

      Here’s why I think they went the HTML5/JS route: Windows on ARM. The problem of backwards compatibility has always been a major one for MS to consider with Windows. How do you run applications on x86 Windows as well as ARM Windows? What’s the only truly platform-independent environment with a massive user base? 

      This is the reason they chose to use the IE10 renderer to serve as a wrapper for the start screen. That way all these newfangled Windows 8 apps will run on both versions independently of architecture.
       
      The WP7 toolkit is already based 100% on SL. I’m willing to bet you’ll be able to do the same on Windows 8 and Xbox. 

      If I’m wrong, Microsoft will have cannibalized its entire developer base. I honestly don’t see it happening.

    • Tom

      Every journalist who follows Microsoft has been hinting (from undisclosed sources) that Silverlight has a role to play in the tile API.  Yet Microsoft has been completely silent on this — and Sinofsky talked only about backcompat in response to a *direct* question about Silverlight.  When you combine that with the semi-abandonment of WPF and the rumors that have been leaking out over the past six months …

      I’m also skeptical that they can make a go of a solely HTML + JS based API.

      But seriously, you could not come up with a worse developer relations strategy if Microsoft PR were filled with fifth columnists from competitors.

    • Tom

      Every journalist who follows Microsoft has been hinting (from undisclosed sources) that Silverlight has a role to play in the tile API.  Yet Microsoft has been completely silent on this — and Sinofsky talked only about backcompat in response to a *direct* question about Silverlight.  When you combine that with the semi-abandonment of WPF and the rumors that have been leaking out over the past six months …

      I’m also skeptical that they can make a go of a solely HTML + JS based API.

      But seriously, you could not come up with a worse developer relations strategy if Microsoft PR were filled with fifth columnists from competitors.

    • http://twitter.com/MossyBlog Scott Barnes

      Well the SIlverlight teams have been disbanded so its now a case of “..if Silverlight is to come out from under the windows 8 cluster f*ck…what is Silverlight is the actual question here..”

      The thing is they need to make Azure work post all of this, the cloud strategy isn’t getting uptake due to broadband and privacy issues…to then have this “trust us we have it covered” posture that they are likely to take is likely to feel the full effects of this PR brain snap…as the internal assumption is the decision makers around azure aren’t developers… “BDM/TDM != Developer” is the old tactic.. the reality is its the opposite and so when you have a company basically shifting their promises into the state you have before you today well you burn a big bridge with the people you have to convince tomorrow…

      The reality is the Windows team are arrogant when it comes to developers so they aren’t conscious of the full effects here. My sources tell me that internally they are basically going “who cares”… as they are betting big on drawing in non-.NET developers next…

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      Where does that team disbandment come from? Seeing how there’s ostensibly an Xbox port coming.

    • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

      It doesn’t make sense to abandon a winning platform for WP7, Xbox, & LOB apps.   Especially  when it’s obvious people will want to carry their WP7 apps over to Windows 8. 

      But as they saying goes “The silence is deafening”

      If Microsoft really cared about the Silveright/.Net community they would have already made a statement by now.

      At the same time I can’t imagine they would support two different development models for building phone apps vs tablet apps.   It just doesn’t make any sense.

    • Guest

      “Their wording during D9 however made it pretty clear that time that they’re going to run on the regular desktop only and not as immersive apps.”

      I thought this post indicated that silverlight is going to be able to make these immersive experiences (or did I misread your comment)?
      Silverlight seems like the right development platform for this experience.

    • http://openid.tomservo.eu/ Tom Servo

      When the Microsofties were prodded about it at D9, they said their new framework for these immersive applications was based on HTML5+JS. Any other type of applications would run under the regular desktop.

    • http://thounsell.co.uk/ Thomas Hounsell

      It’s evidently bollocks. Even a cursory look over the leaked Windows 8 builds already shows there is a *native* API for Immersive Applications, and where there’s native, there’s .NET these days.

  • http://twitter.com/matt_nologo Matt

    Great article Tom.
    As a SL developer I NEED native support for it – so here’s hoping.

    • zver

      Please,

      I beg all that are interested in this subject (as I am), to read this forum discussions,
      people there are extremely informed , start from this post:

      http://forums.mydigitallife.info/thread … post441473

      and go further….

      quote:

      “well, I just found some hints about “Jupiter” inside DirectUI.dll

      there
      is some code registering a window class named “JupiterWindowClass”, and
      creating window with this class and name “Jupiter Window”,
      there is also some strings like “JupiterHost” and “JupiterNative”.
      there
      is even a registry key under
      HKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWAREMicrosoftDirectUI called
      “EnableJupiterCachedComposition”, along with “EnableNewWalk” and
      “EnableAcceleratedGraphics”

      plus, there is many many references
      to Silverlight inside DirectUI.dll, and many stuff related tech like
      DeepZoom, SmoothStreaming, WebBrowserBrush etc. maybe it IS the
      ‘Silverlight for Desktop’ , actually.

      there is even some code
      could possibly mapping the ‘System.Windows.*’ namespaces into
      “Windows.UI.DirectUI.*” namespaces, eh… not sure about this.

      I
      saw many people in the Silverlight community become very anxious because
      Sinofsky said something about HTML5/JavaScript. I think Microsoft
      should be talking about this DirectUI.dll thing as soon as possible,
      also the Windows.*.dll libraries, especially Windows.UI.Immersive”

      people there are extremely informed , start from this post:

      http://forums.mydigitallife.info/thread … post441473

      and go further….

      quote:

      “well, I just found some hints about “Jupiter” inside DirectUI.dll

      there
      is some code registering a window class named “JupiterWindowClass”, and
      creating window with this class and name “Jupiter Window”,
      there is also some strings like “JupiterHost” and “JupiterNative”.
      there
      is even a registry key under
      HKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWAREMicrosoftDirectUI called
      “EnableJupiterCachedComposition”, along with “EnableNewWalk” and
      “EnableAcceleratedGraphics”

      plus, there is many many references
      to Silverlight inside DirectUI.dll, and many stuff related tech like
      DeepZoom, SmoothStreaming, WebBrowserBrush etc. maybe it IS the
      ‘Silverlight for Desktop’ , actually.

      there is even some code
      could possibly mapping the ‘System.Windows.*’ namespaces into
      “Windows.UI.DirectUI.*” namespaces, eh… not sure about this.

      I
      saw many people in the Silverlight community become very anxious because
      Sinofsky said something about HTML5/JavaScript. I think Microsoft
      should be talking about this DirectUI.dll thing as soon as possible,
      also the Windows.*.dll libraries, especially Windows.UI.Immersive” 

  • Aaron

    Tom, can you please give some evidence that Silverlight will be used in the Jupiter App model you mention?  I remember hearing that about a year ago, but lately Microsoft’s strategy really seems to have shifted to HTML5/JS in order to impress the dumb a$$ standards community.  I think they are abandoning the Silverlight version of Bing Maps (which I loved!).  As a C# developer, this makes me very worried for Silverlight’s future and the future of the .NET framework as a whole.  I really do hope this latest HTML/JS craze is just a short lived fad and people will remember why strongly typed managed OO programing languages are the best route for anything more complicated than a simple web page.  Pointing out that Metro UI will be used on the 3 screens doesn’t prove a damn thing to me.

    Mary-Jo from ZDNet is also worried that Microsoft is trying to wean people off from Silverlight.
    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-needs-to-tell-windows-8-developers-now-about-jupiter-and-silverlight/9608

    • phil jay

      For me this more likely reads like he’s found out that Jupiter is being used in Win8 alongside with silverlight bindings.

    • Anonymous

      http://forums.mydigitallife.info/threads/26404-Windows-8-(7955)-Findings-in-M3-Leak?p=441473&viewfull=1#post441473

      Some strong indications Jupiter is “Silverlight for desktop” which has been what leaks have been reporting for some time now.

    • Phil

      Agreed. What makes iApps sell is the upscale user experience. Silverlight enables developers to build super slick Windows/WP7 apps in the same manner that Apple’s Objective C++ is used to build native apps on the iPhone/iPad. Native apps outsell HTML/JS apps by huge margins because of their slicker, sexier, faster interfaces. It would be suicide for MS to rely upon HTML/JS apps to compete with iApps. They have to leverage Silverlight to stay competitive.

  • NativeFloridian

    I want a new “Windows Media Center” xbox app that can access my TV tuner on the computer.  In addition, they could sell an Xbox peripheral with a tuner included… they could use that to sell the idea of a cable-free Microsoft-centric living room.  Of course, none of this is needed is XBOX LIVE TV is truly revolutionary, but I am skeptical. 

    As long as I’m spouting off ideas, why not include an Xbox peripheral including a wireless keyboard and IE10 for surfing the internet from the couch.  Make it so you have to have a GOLD account… that way MS is making $50 bucks a year off of it.  An Xbox with IE10 and a keyboard would make a great computer from grandma, too!

    Peace.

  • NativeFloridian

    If this is true… it seems like Microsoft finally has a real and tangible strategy to go up against the new big boys (Apple and Google).  A universal platform will help turn the many Windows PC users into users of the Microsoft Phone, tablet, and Xbox platforms.  Having access to purchased apps and games across these platforms is a game changer.

    Pressing the BUY button on MSFT !!!

  • http://profiles.google.com/carlosrfonseca Carlos Ribeiro da Fonseca

    And lets not forget that Silverlight is a subset of the .NET Framework so its CPU independent.

    So it’ll be, build once, run everywhere.

    That sounds nice. Very nice!
    :)

    • Guest

      Exactly. They don’t need HTML5 + Javascript – .NET is already cross-platform, and it is better development platform for such apps IMO.

  • http://www.hdolder.com/CutBSK6fN.htm H.Dolder

    Thesis – Antithesis – SynthesisQ: What if instead of considering Silverlight/WPF “versus” HTML5 Microsoft is implementing  Silverlight/WPF “ON” HTML5 (replacing DirectX by HTML5)?A: MS could easily port their (our) applications to all platforms that support HTML5.http://www.hdolder.com/CutBSK6fN.htm
    H.Dolder

    • Anonymous

      Porting the silverlight and .net runtime from C++/C to javascript and canvas? That would be insanely slow and memory hogging.

    • http://www.hdolder.com/CutBSK6fN.htm H.Dolder

      Why Javascript ? Think again !

    • Anonymous

      Think what again? Writing something as large and complex as silverlight and .net in javascript would be extreamely large and slow to run. On top of that Silverlight is something that needs to be extrreamly optimised for performance to be at all useful. porting it to javascript would immediately make it useless.

    • phil jay

      I personally still think Google Native Client is the future ;P

    • Anonymous

      Think what again? Writing something as large and complex as silverlight and .net in javascript would be extreamely large and slow to run. On top of that Silverlight is something that needs to be extrreamly optimised for performance to be at all useful. porting it to javascript would immediately make it useless.

    • Anonymous

      Think what again? Writing something as large and complex as silverlight and .net in javascript would be extreamely large and slow to run. On top of that Silverlight is something that needs to be extrreamly optimised for performance to be at all useful. porting it to javascript would immediately make it useless.

    • Anonymous

      Porting the silverlight and .net runtime from C++/C to javascript and canvas? That would be insanely slow and memory hogging.

  • Mark

    I like Metro for a phone and tablet. Still not sure about it on a PC. But MS needs a lot more than a new UI if they want to keep users “sticking with Windows over Chrome OS/Android, OS X/ iOS and others.”

    Sounds like we’ll get a faster boot, which for mobile is nice but useless on my desktop which is never shutdown. Maintenance of a Windows computer is still much more work than it should be. And the malware issues are still daunting. And then there’s the other gems, like system rot over time. I’m anal about keeping my machine (W7 64) clean, defragged, removing flash cookies, etc, etc, and I’m still facing a new install after a year of operation because I have enough things that have slowed down which can’t be fixed any other way. Then there’s all the small details that could be improved. A system-wide spell checker is the most glaringly obvious. I mean, c’mon, the maker of Office doesn’t have a spell checker in the OS but Apple does? One update mechanism for the OS and all installed apps, like Linux has, would also make a huge difference. I’d love bulk delete of apps in control panel. I’d love the more granular disk options of OS X. Native mount of an ISO without having to download add-on software is another no brainer. The list is endless. I may well turn off Metro on my PC, just like I did the Vista sidebar (have to wait and see how useful it is). But it’s those other improvements that would keep me using Windows as my primary OS. 

    • Guest

      Apple’s application installation process is also far superior. Drag and install. Done. No “launching installation wizard”, multiple status screens, an eventual “completed” and finally the depressing reboot required.

    • Anonymous

      it’s my understand a reboot isn’t required unless the installer is installing drivers along with the application.

    • Dhaoracle

      Yea sounds like you don’t want to think and want Apple to do all of that for you. I like going through the phase of installation. I can see where it is going and what parts i want to download. What you are talking about it an app on a computer not an Application/Program.. 

    • Anonymous

      haha… yeah until you have to delete files manually?… yeah sure “superior” everytime i see your name i see how much you troll… yeah my friend has a mac, she has complained about it. i like how superior in the end is the same thing… but at least i have a uninstaller thing.

    • Tom

      Applications on Mac OS register themselves on first run.  No different from on Windows.

      The only thing they did is hide the installer from you.  That’s not an advancement.

    • Guest

      I think when (if) they introduce that new app store, we’ll get the same kind of experience. Assuming we’re talking about those .appx packages (in Silverlight, I presume – but could be other), they should all run sandboxed and be completely isolated: Windows Phone-type installation.

  • Mark

    I like Metro for a phone and tablet. Still not sure about it on a PC. But MS needs a lot more than a new UI if they want to keep users “sticking with Windows over Chrome OS/Android, OS X/ iOS and others.”

    Sounds like we’ll get a faster boot, which for mobile is nice but useless on my desktop which is never shutdown. Maintenance of a Windows computer is still much more work than it should be. And the malware issues are still daunting. And then there’s the other gems, like system rot over time. I’m anal about keeping my machine (W7 64) clean, defragged, removing flash cookies, etc, etc, and I’m still facing a new install after a year of operation because I have enough things that have slowed down which can’t be fixed any other way. Then there’s all the small details that could be improved. A system-wide spell checker is the most glaringly obvious. I mean, c’mon, the maker of Office doesn’t have a spell checker in the OS but Apple does? One update mechanism for the OS and all installed apps, like Linux has, would also make a huge difference. I’d love bulk delete of apps in control panel. I’d love the more granular disk options of OS X. Native mount of an ISO without having to download add-on software is another no brainer. The list is endless. I may well turn off Metro on my PC, just like I did the Vista sidebar (have to wait and see how useful it is). But it’s those other improvements that would keep me using Windows as my primary OS. 

  • Mark

    I like Metro for a phone and tablet. Still not sure about it on a PC. But MS needs a lot more than a new UI if they want to keep users “sticking with Windows over Chrome OS/Android, OS X/ iOS and others.”

    Sounds like we’ll get a faster boot, which for mobile is nice but useless on my desktop which is never shutdown. Maintenance of a Windows computer is still much more work than it should be. And the malware issues are still daunting. And then there’s the other gems, like system rot over time. I’m anal about keeping my machine (W7 64) clean, defragged, removing flash cookies, etc, etc, and I’m still facing a new install after a year of operation because I have enough things that have slowed down which can’t be fixed any other way. Then there’s all the small details that could be improved. A system-wide spell checker is the most glaringly obvious. I mean, c’mon, the maker of Office doesn’t have a spell checker in the OS but Apple does? One update mechanism for the OS and all installed apps, like Linux has, would also make a huge difference. I’d love bulk delete of apps in control panel. I’d love the more granular disk options of OS X. Native mount of an ISO without having to download add-on software is another no brainer. The list is endless. I may well turn off Metro on my PC, just like I did the Vista sidebar (have to wait and see how useful it is). But it’s those other improvements that would keep me using Windows as my primary OS. 

  • Anonymous

    SILVERLIGHT + MS + WP + WINDOWS FTW

  • http://twitter.com/MossyBlog Scott Barnes

    Tom,

    Where’d you pull the info that Jupiter and Silverlight are connected? … just a heads up is all…

  • http://twitter.com/oolong2 oolong2

    You can assume this is Microsoft’s plan since this is what they have been talking about for ages…  However the problem is that Microsft doesn’t appear to be backing their own technology.  You don’t go publically talking about HTML5 development on Windows 8 and don’t even mention Silverlight or .Net

    HTML was designed first and formost for consuming content not apps…  In it’s 20 years of existance it has ALWAYS sucked as a development model for building applications.  It was only convenient for deploying applications.  HTMl5/CSS3 has added a lot of nice features making it much more capable than it used to be, but it still sucks for application development.

    Microsoft should position Silverlight as the Java alternative for a cross platform development technology.  Through Mono there is already support for silverlight on Linux, and upcoming support for iPhone and iPad.  The whole idea of silverlight in the first place was to be cross platform.   Everything is there…  It’s just a matter of packaging and deployment.

  • http://twitter.com/skatingn330 Matt Miley

    I think they should setup a MEDIA CENTER APP STORE that developers could submit to. Or I bet they will have the WINDOWS STORE ICON in MEDIA CENTER that way if you make a game that uses a remote or a controller on the big screen you huge launch it right there, That seems like a no brainer to me. ALso they need to support the kinect in media center on the xbox and pc.

    • Anonymous

      From what Im seeing, Media Center is dead. Live TV, photos, music, video, gaming etc will all be under the Xbox brand and will replace Media Center. I very much doubt Windows 8 will ship with a new version of MC, or one at all.

  • FMH

    Tom is a reliable source. :) If he says it, it will be so!

  • Anonymous

    Did some thinking.
    People were talking about “Jupiter” being silverlight for desktop. I’m starting to think that even though silverlight apps won’t run in that same “immersive” environment as those HTML5 applications, maybe they will just run on the desktop, but in full screen mode, so that it looks like an “immersive” app?
    Though I think it would be better if they provide the controlls for those black slide in UI things at the top and bottom in Silverlight.

  • http://www.facebook.com/donald.g.bolton Donald Bolton

    I’ve certainly been enjoying all your comments here.  And after reading them over and trying to piece stuff together, I have to say I’ve reached a kind of epiphany:  I don’t think MS ever intend to abandon Silverlight. Isn’t it obvious over the last couple of years how they have moved to embed everything into Silverlight?  Anyway, back to my epiphany:

    Jupiter= Silverlight, and then you can think of all the other technologies as the representative orbiting moons (any order you wish, but you’ll get the general idea):

    IE 10 = Ganymede
    HTML 5 = Callisto
    Javascript = Io
    SQL/Azure = Europa

    and so on.  Quite simply, Windows 8 will run on Silverlight.  That’s the big risk Ballmer was alluding to.  Silverlight will be the massive gravitational force that will be the center of all the other orbiting technologies.  The HTML5 + Javascript only in the last few weeks was only a red herring, or in other words to say “Oh yeah, we’ll do HTML5 and Javascript too”.  It’s a way of keeping MS “in the game” while they play catch-up.  Then they will slamdunk everyone in the end with their mammoth announcement at Build.  I bet my a$$ on it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/donald.g.bolton Donald Bolton

    I’ve certainly been enjoying all your comments here.  And after reading them over and trying to piece stuff together, I have to say I’ve reached a kind of epiphany:  I don’t think MS ever intend to abandon Silverlight. Isn’t it obvious over the last couple of years how they have moved to embed everything into Silverlight?  Anyway, back to my epiphany:

    Jupiter= Silverlight, and then you can think of all the other technologies as the representative orbiting moons (any order you wish, but you’ll get the general idea):

    IE 10 = Ganymede
    HTML 5 = Callisto
    Javascript = Io
    SQL/Azure = Europa

    and so on.  Quite simply, Windows 8 will run on Silverlight.  That’s the big risk Ballmer was alluding to.  Silverlight will be the massive gravitational force that will be the center of all the other orbiting technologies.  The HTML5 + Javascript only in the last few weeks was only a red herring, or in other words to say “Oh yeah, we’ll do HTML5 and Javascript too”.  It’s a way of keeping MS “in the game” while they play catch-up.  Then they will slamdunk everyone in the end with their mammoth announcement at Build.  I bet my a$$ on it.

    • Anonymous

      Don’t forget that “Apollo” is the code name for the post mango version of windows phone ;]. Apollo being the the son of Jupiter. Make what you will of that :].

  • WP7 User

    Long live Silverlight and WPF!!!

  • Nedster144

    I hope all this is true.  As a Silverlight developer this would be a dream comet true to me.  I think it is the obvious and smart thing for Microsoft to do but I won’t believe it until Microsoft confirms it. 

  • Light Crystal

    I want develop in silverlight also FOR THE WEB! We need a Silverlight to Html5+JS converter only for the Web ( with its limits ) and native Sl apps for WP7, tablets and Desktops.
    THIS IS THE ONLY WAY MS can beat the competitors.I really expect something like Script# announced on BUILD

    • t316

      Yes – I second this thought!

  • Anonymous

    On Metro UI, Development, and Windows 8…

    Let’s first be honest – HTML5 is good for the basics.  A great language to develop in for a fast “show and tell”… it is pathetic for building indepth, integrating, and sophisticated apps.   Look no further than what Microsoft showed for the Windows 8 apps…  SIMPLE.  They do not require much to build and they easily display information quickly.   Think of the Metro UI front end to Windows 8 a “browser”.   It mimics what the web generallly provides to users.   Think of the front end as a QUICK view of information that is relevant – the apps are not particularly rich – they may provide some web-service style input for text, picture uploading control, video uploading control but this is where things kind of stop.   For indepth control of pictures (real photo editing) for instance one must drop down into a powerful app which provides indepth offline capabilities, solid manipulation capabilities… those are things that HTML5 will not be able to do in great depth – HTML5 just isn’t powerful enough for that.    That whole “drop down a level” experience will be built off native apps that continue on the tradition of providing extensive power.  

    Simplicity is the ticket.   While developers want to build complex and awesome apps end users don’t always NEED these types of capabilities.   They want the ability to quickly do the things they like to do on the web… simple, straight forward, and entertaining.   I hate to say it but we live in a rather “dumb” society.  As much as we are all nerds 80-90% of people just want to explore with out complexity.  They want to consume… not create… and when they want to create unless creating in an area of immense understanding they want simplicity.  

    So this leads me to where we are from a UI perspective with Windows 8.   Want to know why Apple is having such great success?  It boils down to simplicity.   This is always why Apple has carved out their niche and grown.   Windows has just become to confusing, to connected to a legacy where PCs are rooted in a disconnected world.   Windows 8 appears to be a big bet moving into a transition to the cloud.  

    Web services+Devices+Branding+Developers = the Ecosystem – Microsoft is massively serious about turning the ship around for consumers.  Windows 8 is just the start.

  • Blue Jay

    Sorry, the Metro UI is frankly childish and repungnant as a desktop interface.  It will mega fail worse than Vista.

  • H,Dolder

    More on …Can one theory explain all things MS is saying ? I propose the following “Standard Model”:MS is …* Creating a NET W8 Framework in which they are …* Replacing DirectX with the HTML5 Rendering Engine.* Replacing MSIL with Javascript.* Implementing Silverlight/WPF/XNA (http://jsil.org/) in a layer on top of HTML5 (not side-by-side with HTML5).* Viewing the HTML5 Browsers as “Plugins” for the different Operating Systems and adding also Out-of-Browser (OOB) functionality for each OS.Can you imagine the impact on portability ?
    H.Dolderhttp://www.hdolder.com/CutBSK6fN.htm